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Taming Trojan horses: identifying and mitigating corporate social responsibility risks

Pursey Heugens and Nikolay Dentchev UGent (2007) JOURNAL OF BUSINESS ETHICS. 75(2). p.151-170
abstract
Organizations are exposed to increasing pressures from their constituents to integrate corporate social responsibility (CSR) principles into their ongoing business practices. But accepting new and potentially open-ended commitments is not a harmless exercise, and companies may well expose themselves to serious risks when embracing such principles. To identify these risks, we conducted two naturalistic studies: one exploratory, the other corroborative. The results show that CSR adoption is associated with at least seven different business risks, ranging from failing strategy implementation to legitimacy destruction. To alleviate these risks, we discuss a set of managerial mitigation strategies that have the potential to realign companies' CSR activities with their strategic objectives.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
corporate social responsibility, corporate social responsibility risks, managerial implications, mitigation strategies, strategy implementation, Trojan horses
journal title
JOURNAL OF BUSINESS ETHICS
J. Bus. Ethics
volume
75
issue
2
pages
151 - 170
publisher
Springer
place of publication
Dordrecht, Netherlands
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000249503500003
JCR category
ETHICS
JCR impact factor
0.538 (2007)
JCR rank
16/28 (2007)
JCR quartile
3 (2007)
ISSN
0167-4544
DOI
10.1007/s10551-006-9242-y
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
id
665372
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-665372
date created
2009-05-25 23:48:34
date last changed
2015-06-17 11:12:42
@article{665372,
  abstract     = {Organizations are exposed to increasing pressures from their constituents to integrate corporate social responsibility (CSR) principles into their ongoing business practices. But accepting new and potentially open-ended commitments is not a harmless exercise, and companies may well expose themselves to serious risks when embracing such principles. To identify these risks, we conducted two naturalistic studies: one exploratory, the other corroborative. The results show that CSR adoption is associated with at least seven different business risks, ranging from failing strategy implementation to legitimacy destruction. To alleviate these risks, we discuss a set of managerial mitigation strategies that have the potential to realign companies' CSR activities with their strategic objectives.},
  author       = {Heugens, Pursey and Dentchev, Nikolay},
  issn         = {0167-4544},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF BUSINESS ETHICS},
  keyword      = {corporate social responsibility,corporate social responsibility risks,managerial implications,mitigation strategies,strategy implementation,Trojan horses},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {151--170},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  title        = {Taming Trojan horses: identifying and mitigating corporate social responsibility risks},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10551-006-9242-y},
  volume       = {75},
  year         = {2007},
}

Chicago
Heugens, Pursey, and Nikolay Dentchev. 2007. “Taming Trojan Horses: Identifying and Mitigating Corporate Social Responsibility Risks.” Journal of Business Ethics 75 (2): 151–170.
APA
Heugens, P., & Dentchev, N. (2007). Taming Trojan horses: identifying and mitigating corporate social responsibility risks. JOURNAL OF BUSINESS ETHICS, 75(2), 151–170.
Vancouver
1.
Heugens P, Dentchev N. Taming Trojan horses: identifying and mitigating corporate social responsibility risks. JOURNAL OF BUSINESS ETHICS. Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer; 2007;75(2):151–70.
MLA
Heugens, Pursey, and Nikolay Dentchev. “Taming Trojan Horses: Identifying and Mitigating Corporate Social Responsibility Risks.” JOURNAL OF BUSINESS ETHICS 75.2 (2007): 151–170. Print.