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Dietary arginine supplementation speeds pulmonary VO2 kinetics during cycle exercise

Katrien Koppo UGent, Youri Taes UGent, Andries Pottier, Jan Boone UGent, Jacques Bouckaert UGent and Wim Derave UGent (2009) Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 41(8). p.1626-1632
abstract
Purpose: To test the hypothesis that L-arginine (the substrate for nitric oxide synthase [NOS]) administration slows the VO2 kinetics at the onset of moderate-intensity exercise in human. Methods: Seven physically active males were randomly assigned to receive either placebo (lactose) or L-arginine hydrochloride capsules (7.2 g.d(-1)) for 14 d in a double-blind crossover design, with a 7-d washout period between the two conditions. On day 11 and day 14 of each condition. the subjects completed two consecutive 6-min boots of cycle exercise at 80% of the ventilatory threshold with a 12-min rest interval. VO2 was measured on a breath-by-breath basis. and VO2 kinetics were determined with a single exponential model from the averaged data derived from four repetitions. Capillary and venous blood samples were taken to determine plasma [La] and serum [arginine], respectively. Results: There were no differences in circulating lactate either before or during exercise. However, serum [arginine] was higher (P < 0.05) in the arginine condition at rest (119.0 +/- 12.6 vs 103.6 +/- 15.7 mu mol.L-1 in the control condition) and after exercise (113.3 +/- 26.0 vs, 103.8 +/- 12.6 mu mol.L-1 in the control condition). With regard to the pulmonary VO2 kinetics, no significant difference was observed in the time at which the phase II response emerged or in the phase II amplitude between the two conditions. However, contrary to our hypothesis, the time constant was significantly reduced after arginine administration (i.e., 13.9 +/- 3.1 vs 15.8 +/- 2.6 s in the control condition, (P <= 0.014). Conclusion: Exogenous L-arginine administration speeds the phase II pulmonary VO2 response by 12% at the onset of moderate-intensity exercise in humans.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
journal title
Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
Med. Sci. Sports Exerc.
volume
41
issue
8
pages
1626 - 1632
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000268123700012
JCR category
SPORT SCIENCES
JCR impact factor
3.707 (2009)
JCR rank
2/72 (2009)
JCR quartile
1 (2009)
ISSN
0195-9131
DOI
10.1249/MSS.0b013e31819d81b6
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
id
663262
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-663262
date created
2009-05-21 14:37:21
date last changed
2010-01-22 14:31:24
@article{663262,
  abstract     = {Purpose: To test the hypothesis that L-arginine (the substrate for nitric oxide synthase [NOS]) administration slows the VO2 kinetics at the onset of moderate-intensity exercise in human. Methods: Seven physically active males were randomly assigned to receive either placebo (lactose) or L-arginine hydrochloride capsules (7.2 g.d(-1)) for 14 d in a double-blind crossover design, with a 7-d washout period between the two conditions. On day 11 and day 14 of each condition. the subjects completed two consecutive 6-min boots of cycle exercise at 80\% of the ventilatory threshold with a 12-min rest interval. VO2 was measured on a breath-by-breath basis. and VO2 kinetics were determined with a single exponential model from the averaged data derived from four repetitions. Capillary and venous blood samples were taken to determine plasma [La] and serum [arginine], respectively. Results: There were no differences in circulating lactate either before or during exercise. However, serum [arginine] was higher (P {\textlangle} 0.05) in the arginine condition at rest (119.0 +/- 12.6 vs 103.6 +/- 15.7 mu mol.L-1 in the control condition) and after exercise (113.3 +/- 26.0 vs, 103.8 +/- 12.6 mu mol.L-1 in the control condition). With regard to the pulmonary VO2 kinetics, no significant difference was observed in the time at which the phase II response emerged or in the phase II amplitude between the two conditions. However, contrary to our hypothesis, the time constant was significantly reduced after arginine administration (i.e., 13.9 +/- 3.1 vs 15.8 +/- 2.6 s in the control condition, (P {\textlangle}= 0.014). Conclusion: Exogenous L-arginine administration speeds the phase II pulmonary VO2 response by 12\% at the onset of moderate-intensity exercise in humans.},
  author       = {Koppo, Katrien and Taes, Youri and Pottier, Andries and Boone, Jan and Bouckaert, Jacques and Derave, Wim},
  issn         = {0195-9131},
  journal      = {Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {1626--1632},
  title        = {Dietary arginine supplementation speeds pulmonary VO2 kinetics during cycle exercise},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1249/MSS.0b013e31819d81b6},
  volume       = {41},
  year         = {2009},
}

Chicago
Koppo, Katrien, Youri Taes, Andries Pottier, Jan Boone, Jacques Bouckaert, and Wim Derave. 2009. “Dietary Arginine Supplementation Speeds Pulmonary VO2 Kinetics During Cycle Exercise.” Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise 41 (8): 1626–1632.
APA
Koppo, K., Taes, Y., Pottier, A., Boone, J., Bouckaert, J., & Derave, W. (2009). Dietary arginine supplementation speeds pulmonary VO2 kinetics during cycle exercise. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 41(8), 1626–1632.
Vancouver
1.
Koppo K, Taes Y, Pottier A, Boone J, Bouckaert J, Derave W. Dietary arginine supplementation speeds pulmonary VO2 kinetics during cycle exercise. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 2009;41(8):1626–32.
MLA
Koppo, Katrien, Youri Taes, Andries Pottier, et al. “Dietary Arginine Supplementation Speeds Pulmonary VO2 Kinetics During Cycle Exercise.” Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise 41.8 (2009): 1626–1632. Print.