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Impact on knowledge acquisition of the transition from a conventional to an integrated contextual medical curriculum

(2009) MEDICAL EDUCATION. 43(7). p.704-713
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Organization
Abstract
Context: After the implementation of an Integrated Contextual Medical Curriculum (ICMC) it was first hypothesized that ICMC students would attain a higher knowledge level in both basic and clinical sciences at an earlier stage than Conventional Medical Curriculum (CMC) students; secondly that ICMC students would perform significantly better on knowledge tests at the end of their education; and finally that they would show a more linear knowledge acquisition in basic and clinical sciences. Method: We drew upon the Dutch Inter-University Progress Test (PT) to measure impact on knowledge acquisition and compared PT-scores of 393 CMC to scores of 1,028 ICMC students (years 2 to 6) cross-sectionally and compared, in a longitudinal design, 112 CMC with 197 ICMC students from years 3 to 6. Results: As expected ICMC students showed a steeper learning curve in both basic and clinical sciences: at the end of their curriculum students attained a higher level on both knowledge domains. In clinical sciences the curve was almost linear, in basic sciences an even sharper rise could be witnessed revealing a continuing growth of knowledge. Conclusions: The differential impact on knowledge acquisition of conventional and innovative curricula has seldom been studied in a longitudinal and cross-sectional design. This study confirmed our assumptions about the potential of an integrated contextual curriculum. The differences observed in ICMC students were attributed to the stronger emphasis on clinically relevant basic sciences in the early years of the ICMC and to the stronger integration of basic and clinical sciences in the ICMC.
Keywords
SKILLS, ISSUES, EDUCATION, STUDENTS

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Chicago
Van der Veken, Jos, Martin Valcke, Jan De Maeseneer, Lambert Schuwirth, and Anselme Derese. 2009. “Impact on Knowledge Acquisition of the Transition from a Conventional to an Integrated Contextual Medical Curriculum.” Medical Education 43 (7): 704–713.
APA
Van der Veken, J., Valcke, M., De Maeseneer, J., Schuwirth, L., & Derese, A. (2009). Impact on knowledge acquisition of the transition from a conventional to an integrated contextual medical curriculum. MEDICAL EDUCATION, 43(7), 704–713.
Vancouver
1.
Van der Veken J, Valcke M, De Maeseneer J, Schuwirth L, Derese A. Impact on knowledge acquisition of the transition from a conventional to an integrated contextual medical curriculum. MEDICAL EDUCATION. 2009;43(7):704–13.
MLA
Van der Veken, Jos, Martin Valcke, Jan De Maeseneer, et al. “Impact on Knowledge Acquisition of the Transition from a Conventional to an Integrated Contextual Medical Curriculum.” MEDICAL EDUCATION 43.7 (2009): 704–713. Print.
@article{632837,
  abstract     = {Context: After the implementation of an Integrated Contextual Medical Curriculum (ICMC) it was first hypothesized that ICMC students would attain a higher knowledge level in both basic and clinical sciences at an earlier stage than Conventional Medical Curriculum (CMC) students; secondly that ICMC students would perform significantly better on knowledge tests at the end of their education; and finally that they would show a more linear knowledge acquisition in basic and clinical sciences.
Method: We drew upon the Dutch Inter-University Progress Test (PT) to measure impact on knowledge acquisition and compared PT-scores of 393 CMC to scores of 1,028 ICMC students (years 2 to 6) cross-sectionally and compared, in a longitudinal design, 112 CMC with 197 ICMC students from years 3 to 6.
Results: As expected ICMC students showed a steeper learning curve in both basic and clinical sciences: at the end of their curriculum students attained a higher level on both knowledge domains. In clinical sciences the curve was almost linear, in basic sciences an even sharper rise could be witnessed revealing a continuing growth of knowledge.
Conclusions: The differential impact on knowledge acquisition of conventional and innovative curricula has seldom been studied in a longitudinal and cross-sectional design. This study confirmed our assumptions about the potential of an integrated contextual curriculum. The differences observed in ICMC students were attributed to the stronger emphasis on clinically relevant basic sciences in the early years of the ICMC and to the stronger integration of basic and clinical sciences in the ICMC.},
  author       = {Van der Veken, Jos and Valcke, Martin and De Maeseneer, Jan and Schuwirth, Lambert and Derese, Anselme},
  issn         = {1365-2923},
  journal      = {MEDICAL EDUCATION},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {704--713},
  title        = {Impact on knowledge acquisition of the transition from a conventional to an integrated contextual medical curriculum},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2923.2009.03397.x},
  volume       = {43},
  year         = {2009},
}

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