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Optimization of medical imaging display systems: using the channelized Hotelling observer for detecting lung nodules: experimental study

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Abstract
Medical-imaging systems are designed to aid medical specialists in a specific task. Therefore, the physical parameters of a system need to optimize the task performance of a human observer. This requires measurements of human performance in a given task during the system optimization. Typically, psychophysical studies are conducted for this purpose. Numerical observer models have been successfully used to predict human performance in several detection tasks. Especially, the task of signal detection using a channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) in simulated images has been widely explored. However, there are few studies done for clinically acquired images that also contain anatomic noise. In this paper, we investigate the performance of a CHO in the task of detecting lung nodules in real radiographic images of the chest. To evaluate variability introduced by the limited available data, we employ a commonly used study of a multi-reader multi-case (MRMC) scenario. It accounts for both case and reader variability. Finally, we use the "one-shot" methods to estimate the MRMC variance of the area under the ROC curve (AUC). The obtained AUC compares well to those reported for human observer study on a similar data set. Furthermore, the "one-shot" analysis implies a fairly consistent performance of the CHO with the variance of AUC below 0.002. This indicates promising potential for numerical observers in optimization of medical imaging displays and encourages further investigation on the subject.
Keywords
SPECT, PERFORMANCE, MODEL, Model Observers, Image Display, Observer Performance Evaluation

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Chicago
Platisa, Ljiljana, Ewout Vansteenkiste, Bart Goossens, Cédric Marchessoux, Tom Kimpe, and Wilfried Philips. 2009. “Optimization of Medical Imaging Display Systems: Using the Channelized Hotelling Observer for Detecting Lung Nodules: Experimental Study.” In Proceedings of Spie - the International Society for Optical Engineering, ed. Berkman Sahiner and David Manning, 7263:72630P–1–72630P–11. Bellingham, WA, USA: SPIE, the International Society for Optical Engineering.
APA
Platisa, L., Vansteenkiste, E., Goossens, B., Marchessoux, C., Kimpe, T., & Philips, W. (2009). Optimization of medical imaging display systems: using the channelized Hotelling observer for detecting lung nodules: experimental study. In B. Sahiner & D. Manning (Eds.), PROCEEDINGS OF SPIE - THE INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY FOR OPTICAL ENGINEERING (Vol. 7263, pp. 72630P–1–72630P–11). Presented at the Conference on Medical Imaging - Image Perception, Observer Performance, and Technology Assessment, Bellingham, WA, USA: SPIE, the International Society for Optical Engineering.
Vancouver
1.
Platisa L, Vansteenkiste E, Goossens B, Marchessoux C, Kimpe T, Philips W. Optimization of medical imaging display systems: using the channelized Hotelling observer for detecting lung nodules: experimental study. In: Sahiner B, Manning D, editors. PROCEEDINGS OF SPIE - THE INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY FOR OPTICAL ENGINEERING. Bellingham, WA, USA: SPIE, the International Society for Optical Engineering; 2009. p. 72630P–1–72630P–11.
MLA
Platisa, Ljiljana, Ewout Vansteenkiste, Bart Goossens, et al. “Optimization of Medical Imaging Display Systems: Using the Channelized Hotelling Observer for Detecting Lung Nodules: Experimental Study.” Proceedings of Spie - the International Society for Optical Engineering. Ed. Berkman Sahiner & David Manning. Vol. 7263. Bellingham, WA, USA: SPIE, the International Society for Optical Engineering, 2009. 72630P–1–72630P–11. Print.
@inproceedings{623673,
  abstract     = {Medical-imaging systems are designed to aid medical specialists in a specific task. Therefore, the physical parameters of a system need to optimize the task performance of a human observer. This requires measurements of human performance in a given task during the system optimization. Typically, psychophysical studies are conducted for this purpose. Numerical observer models have been successfully used to predict human performance in several detection tasks. Especially, the task of signal detection using a channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) in simulated images has been widely explored. However, there are few studies done for clinically acquired images that also contain anatomic noise. In this paper, we investigate the performance of a CHO in the task of detecting lung nodules in real radiographic images of the chest. To evaluate variability introduced by the limited available data, we employ a commonly used study of a multi-reader multi-case (MRMC) scenario. It accounts for both case and reader variability. Finally, we use the {\textacutedbl}one-shot{\textacutedbl} methods to estimate the MRMC variance of the area under the ROC curve (AUC). The obtained AUC compares well to those reported for human observer study on a similar data set. Furthermore, the {\textacutedbl}one-shot{\textacutedbl} analysis implies a fairly consistent performance of the CHO with the variance of AUC below 0.002. This indicates promising potential for numerical observers in optimization of medical imaging displays and encourages further investigation on the subject.},
  articleno    = {72630P},
  author       = {Platisa, Ljiljana and Vansteenkiste, Ewout and Goossens, Bart and Marchessoux, C{\'e}dric and Kimpe, Tom and Philips, Wilfried},
  booktitle    = {PROCEEDINGS OF SPIE - THE INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY FOR OPTICAL ENGINEERING},
  editor       = {Sahiner, Berkman and Manning, David},
  isbn         = {9780819475145},
  issn         = {0277-786X},
  keyword      = {SPECT,PERFORMANCE,MODEL,Model Observers,Image Display,Observer Performance Evaluation},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Lake Buena Vista, FL, USA},
  pages        = {72630P:72630P-1--72630P:72630P-11},
  publisher    = {SPIE, the International Society for Optical Engineering},
  title        = {Optimization of medical imaging display systems: using the channelized Hotelling observer for detecting lung nodules: experimental study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.812510},
  volume       = {7263},
  year         = {2009},
}

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