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Induction of Tolerance in Solid Organ Transplantation: The Rationale to Develop Clinical Protocols in Liver Transplantation

(2009) Transplantation Proceedings. 41(2). p.603-606
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Abstract
Minimization or withdrawal of immunosuppressive treatments after organ transplantation represents a major objective for improving quality of life and long-term survival of grafted patients. Such a goal may be reached under some clinical conditions, particularly in liver transplantation, making these patients good candidates for tolerance trials. In this context in liver transplantation, the central questions are (1) how to promote the natural propensity of the liver graft to be accepted, (2) which type of immunosuppressive drug should be used for induction and maintenance, and (3) which biomarkers could be used to discriminate tolerant patients from those requiring long-term immunosuppression. Induction therapies using aggressive T-cell-depleting agents may favor graft acceptance. However, persistent and/or rapidly reemerging cell lines, such as memory-type cells or CD8(+) T cells, could represent a significant barrier for induction of tolerance. The type of maintenance drugs also remains questionable. Calcineurin inhibitors may be eventually deleterious in the context of tolerance protocols, through inhibitory effects on regulatory T cells, that are not observed with rapamycin. In conclusion, significant efforts must be made to achieve reliable strategies for immunosuppression minimization or withdrawal after organ transplantation into the clinics.

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MLA
Donckier, Vincent et al. “Induction of Tolerance in Solid Organ Transplantation: The Rationale to Develop Clinical Protocols in Liver Transplantation.” Transplantation Proceedings 41.2 (2009): 603–606. Print.
APA
Donckier, V., Sanchez-Fueyo, A., Craciun, L., Lucidi, V., Buggenhout, A., Troisi, R., Rogiers, X., et al. (2009). Induction of Tolerance in Solid Organ Transplantation: The Rationale to Develop Clinical Protocols in Liver Transplantation. Transplantation Proceedings, 41(2), 603–606. Presented at the 15th Annual Meeting of the Belgian Transplantation Society.
Chicago author-date
Donckier, Vincent, A. Sanchez-Fueyo, L. Craciun, V. Lucidi, A. Buggenhout, Roberto Troisi, Xavier Rogiers, et al. 2009. “Induction of Tolerance in Solid Organ Transplantation: The Rationale to Develop Clinical Protocols in Liver Transplantation.” Transplantation Proceedings 41 (2): 603–606.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Donckier, Vincent, A. Sanchez-Fueyo, L. Craciun, V. Lucidi, A. Buggenhout, Roberto Troisi, Xavier Rogiers, N Bourgeois, N Boon, C Moreno, Isabelle Colle, Hans Van Vlierberghe, Bernard de Hemptinne, and M Goldman. 2009. “Induction of Tolerance in Solid Organ Transplantation: The Rationale to Develop Clinical Protocols in Liver Transplantation.” Transplantation Proceedings 41 (2): 603–606.
Vancouver
1.
Donckier V, Sanchez-Fueyo A, Craciun L, Lucidi V, Buggenhout A, Troisi R, et al. Induction of Tolerance in Solid Organ Transplantation: The Rationale to Develop Clinical Protocols in Liver Transplantation. Transplantation Proceedings. 2009;41(2):603–6.
IEEE
[1]
V. Donckier et al., “Induction of Tolerance in Solid Organ Transplantation: The Rationale to Develop Clinical Protocols in Liver Transplantation,” Transplantation Proceedings, vol. 41, no. 2, pp. 603–606, 2009.
@article{599800,
  abstract     = {Minimization or withdrawal of immunosuppressive treatments after organ transplantation represents a major objective for improving quality of life and long-term survival of grafted patients. Such a goal may be reached under some clinical conditions, particularly in liver transplantation, making these patients good candidates for tolerance trials. In this context in liver transplantation, the central questions are (1) how to promote the natural propensity of the liver graft to be accepted, (2) which type of immunosuppressive drug should be used for induction and maintenance, and (3) which biomarkers could be used to discriminate tolerant patients from those requiring long-term immunosuppression. Induction therapies using aggressive T-cell-depleting agents may favor graft acceptance. However, persistent and/or rapidly reemerging cell lines, such as memory-type cells or CD8(+) T cells, could represent a significant barrier for induction of tolerance. The type of maintenance drugs also remains questionable. Calcineurin inhibitors may be eventually deleterious in the context of tolerance protocols, through inhibitory effects on regulatory T cells, that are not observed with rapamycin. In conclusion, significant efforts must be made to achieve reliable strategies for immunosuppression minimization or withdrawal after organ transplantation into the clinics.},
  author       = {Donckier, Vincent and Sanchez-Fueyo, A. and Craciun, L. and Lucidi, V. and Buggenhout, A. and Troisi, Roberto and Rogiers, Xavier and Bourgeois, N and Boon, N and Moreno, C and Colle, Isabelle and Van Vlierberghe, Hans and de Hemptinne, Bernard and Goldman, M},
  issn         = {0041-1345},
  journal      = {Transplantation Proceedings},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Brussels, Belgium},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {603--606},
  title        = {Induction of Tolerance in Solid Organ Transplantation: The Rationale to Develop Clinical Protocols in Liver Transplantation},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.transproceed.2009.01.040},
  volume       = {41},
  year         = {2009},
}

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