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16S rRNA Amplicon sequencing demonstrates that indoor-reared bumblebees (Bombus terrestris) harbor a core subset of bacteria normally associated with the wild host

Ivan Meeus (UGent) , Laurian Parmentier (UGent) , Annelies Billiet (UGent) , Kevin Maebe (UGent) , Filip Van Nieuwerburgh (UGent) , Dieter Deforce (UGent) , Felix Wäckers, Peter Vandamme (UGent) and Guy Smagghe (UGent)
(2015) PLOS ONE. 10(4).
Author
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Abstract
A MiSeq multiplexed 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing of the gut microbiota of wild and indoor-reared Bombus terrestris (bumblebees) confirmed the presence of a core set of bacteria, which consisted of Neisseriaceae (Snodgrassella), Orbaceae (Gilliamella), Lactobacillaceae (Lactobacillus), and Bifidobacteriaceae (Bifidobacterium). In wild B. terrestris we detected several non-core bacteria having a more variable prevalence. Although Enterobacteriaceae are unreported by non next-generation sequencing studies, it can become a dominant gut resident. Furthermore the presence of some non-core lactobacilli were associated with the relative abundance of bifidobacteria. This association was not observed in indoor-reared bumblebees lacking the non-core bacteria, but having a more standardized microbiota compared to their wild counterparts. The impact of the bottleneck microbiota of indoor-reared bumblebees when they are used in the field for pollination purpose is discussed.
Keywords
DIGESTIVE-TRACT, GUT MICROBIOTA, SP NOV., BEES, DIVERSITY, PATTERNS, DECLINES, HONEYBEE, BIFIDOBACTERIA, CONSERVATION

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Citation

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MLA
Meeus, Ivan et al. “16S rRNA Amplicon Sequencing Demonstrates That Indoor-reared Bumblebees (Bombus Terrestris) Harbor a Core Subset of Bacteria Normally Associated with the Wild Host.” PLOS ONE 10.4 (2015): n. pag. Print.
APA
Meeus, I., Parmentier, L., Billiet, A., Maebe, K., Van Nieuwerburgh, F., Deforce, D., Wäckers, F., et al. (2015). 16S rRNA Amplicon sequencing demonstrates that indoor-reared bumblebees (Bombus terrestris) harbor a core subset of bacteria normally associated with the wild host. PLOS ONE, 10(4).
Chicago author-date
Meeus, Ivan, Laurian Parmentier, Annelies Billiet, Kevin Maebe, Filip Van Nieuwerburgh, Dieter Deforce, Felix Wäckers, Peter Vandamme, and Guy Smagghe. 2015. “16S rRNA Amplicon Sequencing Demonstrates That Indoor-reared Bumblebees (Bombus Terrestris) Harbor a Core Subset of Bacteria Normally Associated with the Wild Host.” Plos One 10 (4).
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Meeus, Ivan, Laurian Parmentier, Annelies Billiet, Kevin Maebe, Filip Van Nieuwerburgh, Dieter Deforce, Felix Wäckers, Peter Vandamme, and Guy Smagghe. 2015. “16S rRNA Amplicon Sequencing Demonstrates That Indoor-reared Bumblebees (Bombus Terrestris) Harbor a Core Subset of Bacteria Normally Associated with the Wild Host.” Plos One 10 (4).
Vancouver
1.
Meeus I, Parmentier L, Billiet A, Maebe K, Van Nieuwerburgh F, Deforce D, et al. 16S rRNA Amplicon sequencing demonstrates that indoor-reared bumblebees (Bombus terrestris) harbor a core subset of bacteria normally associated with the wild host. PLOS ONE. 2015;10(4).
IEEE
[1]
I. Meeus et al., “16S rRNA Amplicon sequencing demonstrates that indoor-reared bumblebees (Bombus terrestris) harbor a core subset of bacteria normally associated with the wild host,” PLOS ONE, vol. 10, no. 4, 2015.
@article{5987552,
  abstract     = {A MiSeq multiplexed 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing of the gut microbiota of wild and indoor-reared Bombus terrestris (bumblebees) confirmed the presence of a core set of bacteria, which consisted of Neisseriaceae (Snodgrassella), Orbaceae (Gilliamella), Lactobacillaceae (Lactobacillus), and Bifidobacteriaceae (Bifidobacterium). In wild B. terrestris we detected several non-core bacteria having a more variable prevalence. Although Enterobacteriaceae are unreported by non next-generation sequencing studies, it can become a dominant gut resident. Furthermore the presence of some non-core lactobacilli were associated with the relative abundance of bifidobacteria. This association was not observed in indoor-reared bumblebees lacking the non-core bacteria, but having a more standardized microbiota compared to their wild counterparts. The impact of the bottleneck microbiota of indoor-reared bumblebees when they are used in the field for pollination purpose is discussed.},
  articleno    = {e0125152},
  author       = {Meeus, Ivan and Parmentier, Laurian and Billiet, Annelies and Maebe, Kevin and Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip and Deforce, Dieter and Wäckers, Felix and Vandamme, Peter and Smagghe, Guy},
  issn         = {1932-6203},
  journal      = {PLOS ONE},
  keywords     = {DIGESTIVE-TRACT,GUT MICROBIOTA,SP NOV.,BEES,DIVERSITY,PATTERNS,DECLINES,HONEYBEE,BIFIDOBACTERIA,CONSERVATION},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {15},
  title        = {16S rRNA Amplicon sequencing demonstrates that indoor-reared bumblebees (Bombus terrestris) harbor a core subset of bacteria normally associated with the wild host},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0125152},
  volume       = {10},
  year         = {2015},
}

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