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Empirically simulated spatial sorting points at fast epigenetic changes in dispersal behaviour

Katrien Van Petegem, Julien Pétillon, David Renault, Nicky Wybouw UGent, Thomas Van Leeuwen UGent, Robby Stoks and Dries Bonte UGent (2015) EVOLUTIONARY ECOLOGY. 29(2). p.299-310
abstract
During range expansion, the most dispersive individuals make up the range front, and assortative mating between these dispersive phenotypes leads to increased dispersiveness (i.e. spatial sorting). The precise inheritance of dispersal, however, is to date largely unknown in many organisms, thereby hampering any progress in evaluating the adaptive potential of species during range expansion. Using the spider mite Tetranychus urticae, we therefore empirically simulated spatial sorting by means of artificial selection on a unique pre-dispersal behaviour, tightly related to emigration. To separate directionality of the response from potential drift, we mimicked a recurrent low number of founders in replicated selection regimes. Afterwards, we inferred the mode of inheritance of the pre-dispersal behaviour by performing reciprocal crosses between selected (i.e. dispersive) and non-selected (i.e. non-dispersive) mites and by screening for endosymbionts known to be associated with changes in dispersal behaviour. Despite the recurrent low number of founders, the aerial dispersal behaviour responded strongly to the imposed selection pressure. The behaviour furthermore showed a maternal inheritance, though independent of any known dispersal-related endosymbionts. Though cytoplasmic inheritance cannot fully be excluded, we attribute the observed strong and rapid, maternally influenced response in dispersal to transgenerational epigenetic effects. Consequently, we can expect fast evolutionary dynamics during range expansion in the species.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
Founder effect, Range expansion, Tetranychus urticae, Artificial selection, Maternal inheritance, Endosymbionts, TETRANYCHUS-URTICAE ACARI, DNA AMPLIFICATION, NATAL DISPERSAL, SELECTION, EVOLUTION, INCOMPATIBILITY, POPULATIONS, INHERITANCE, WOLBACHIA, RESPONSES
journal title
EVOLUTIONARY ECOLOGY
Evol. Ecol.
volume
29
issue
2
pages
299 - 310
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000349964700007
JCR category
ECOLOGY
JCR impact factor
1.875 (2015)
JCR rank
73/149 (2015)
JCR quartile
2 (2015)
ISSN
0269-7653
DOI
10.1007/s10682-015-9756-9
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
5987351
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-5987351
date created
2015-06-09 14:36:32
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:38:56
@article{5987351,
  abstract     = {During range expansion, the most dispersive individuals make up the range front, and assortative mating between these dispersive phenotypes leads to increased dispersiveness (i.e. spatial sorting). The precise inheritance of dispersal, however, is to date largely unknown in many organisms, thereby hampering any progress in evaluating the adaptive potential of species during range expansion. Using the spider mite Tetranychus urticae, we therefore empirically simulated spatial sorting by means of artificial selection on a unique pre-dispersal behaviour, tightly related to emigration. To separate directionality of the response from potential drift, we mimicked a recurrent low number of founders in replicated selection regimes. Afterwards, we inferred the mode of inheritance of the pre-dispersal behaviour by performing reciprocal crosses between selected (i.e. dispersive) and non-selected (i.e. non-dispersive) mites and by screening for endosymbionts known to be associated with changes in dispersal behaviour. Despite the recurrent low number of founders, the aerial dispersal behaviour responded strongly to the imposed selection pressure. The behaviour furthermore showed a maternal inheritance, though independent of any known dispersal-related endosymbionts. Though cytoplasmic inheritance cannot fully be excluded, we attribute the observed strong and rapid, maternally influenced response in dispersal to transgenerational epigenetic effects. Consequently, we can expect fast evolutionary dynamics during range expansion in the species.},
  author       = {Van Petegem, Katrien and P{\'e}tillon, Julien and Renault, David and Wybouw, Nicky and Van Leeuwen, Thomas and Stoks, Robby and Bonte, Dries},
  issn         = {0269-7653},
  journal      = {EVOLUTIONARY ECOLOGY},
  keyword      = {Founder effect,Range expansion,Tetranychus urticae,Artificial selection,Maternal inheritance,Endosymbionts,TETRANYCHUS-URTICAE ACARI,DNA AMPLIFICATION,NATAL DISPERSAL,SELECTION,EVOLUTION,INCOMPATIBILITY,POPULATIONS,INHERITANCE,WOLBACHIA,RESPONSES},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {299--310},
  title        = {Empirically simulated spatial sorting points at fast epigenetic changes in dispersal behaviour},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10682-015-9756-9},
  volume       = {29},
  year         = {2015},
}

Chicago
Van Petegem, Katrien, Julien Pétillon, David Renault, Nicky Wybouw, Thomas Van Leeuwen, Robby Stoks, and Dries Bonte. 2015. “Empirically Simulated Spatial Sorting Points at Fast Epigenetic Changes in Dispersal Behaviour.” Evolutionary Ecology 29 (2): 299–310.
APA
Van Petegem, Katrien, Pétillon, J., Renault, D., Wybouw, N., Van Leeuwen, T., Stoks, R., & Bonte, D. (2015). Empirically simulated spatial sorting points at fast epigenetic changes in dispersal behaviour. EVOLUTIONARY ECOLOGY, 29(2), 299–310.
Vancouver
1.
Van Petegem K, Pétillon J, Renault D, Wybouw N, Van Leeuwen T, Stoks R, et al. Empirically simulated spatial sorting points at fast epigenetic changes in dispersal behaviour. EVOLUTIONARY ECOLOGY. 2015;29(2):299–310.
MLA
Van Petegem, Katrien, Julien Pétillon, David Renault, et al. “Empirically Simulated Spatial Sorting Points at Fast Epigenetic Changes in Dispersal Behaviour.” EVOLUTIONARY ECOLOGY 29.2 (2015): 299–310. Print.