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The catecholamine stress hormones norepinephrine and dopamine increase the virulence of pathogenic Vibrio anguillarum and Vibrio campbellii

Pande Gde Sasmita Julyantoro, Thao Suong Nguyen, Peter Bossier UGent and Tom Defoirdt UGent (2014) FEMS MICROBIOLOGY ECOLOGY. 90(3). p.761-769
abstract
Obtaining a better understanding of mechanisms involved in bacterial infections is of paramount importance for the development of novel agents to control disease caused by (antibiotic resistant) pathogens in aquaculture. In this study, we investigated the impact of catecholamine stress hormones on growth and virulence factor production of pathogenic vibrios (i.e. two Vibrio campbellii strains and two Vibrio anguillarum strains). Both norepinephrine and dopamine (at 100 mu M) significantly induced growth in media containing serum. The compounds also increased swimming motility of the tested strains, whereas they had no effect on caseinase, chitinase, and hemolysin activities. Further, antagonists for eukaryotic catecholamine receptors were able to neutralize some of the effects of the catecholamines. Indeed, the dopaminergic receptor antagonist chlorpromazine neutralized the effect of dopamine, and the a-adrenergic receptor antagonists phentolamine and phenoxybenzamine neutralized the effect of norepinephrine, whereas the beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist propranolol had limited to no effect. Finally, pretreatment of pathogenic V. campbellii with catecholamines significantly increased its virulence toward giant freshwater prawn larvae. However, the impact of catecholamine receptor antagonists on in vivo virulence was less clear-cut when compared to the in vitro experiments. In summary, our results show that - similar to enteric pathogens - catecholamines also increase the virulence of vibrios that are pathogenic to aquatic organisms by increasing motility and growth in media containing serum.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
microbial endocrinology, host-microbe interaction, vibriosis, WATER GIANT PRAWN, ENTEROHEMORRHAGIC ESCHERICHIA-COLI, QUORUM SENSING SIGNALS, MACROBRACHIUM-ROSENBERGII, MICROBIAL ENDOCRINOLOGY, ARTEMIA-FRANCISCANA, SALMONELLA-ENTERICA, HARVEYI, GROWTH, INVOLVEMENT
journal title
FEMS MICROBIOLOGY ECOLOGY
FEMS Microbiol. Ecol.
volume
90
issue
3
pages
761 - 769
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000346057900019
JCR category
MICROBIOLOGY
JCR impact factor
3.568 (2014)
JCR rank
31/119 (2014)
JCR quartile
2 (2014)
ISSN
0168-6496
DOI
10.1111/1574-6941.12432
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
5965905
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-5965905
date created
2015-05-27 10:24:03
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:47:01
@article{5965905,
  abstract     = {Obtaining a better understanding of mechanisms involved in bacterial infections is of paramount importance for the development of novel agents to control disease caused by (antibiotic resistant) pathogens in aquaculture. In this study, we investigated the impact of catecholamine stress hormones on growth and virulence factor production of pathogenic vibrios (i.e. two Vibrio campbellii strains and two Vibrio anguillarum strains). Both norepinephrine and dopamine (at 100 mu M) significantly induced growth in media containing serum. The compounds also increased swimming motility of the tested strains, whereas they had no effect on caseinase, chitinase, and hemolysin activities. Further, antagonists for eukaryotic catecholamine receptors were able to neutralize some of the effects of the catecholamines. Indeed, the dopaminergic receptor antagonist chlorpromazine neutralized the effect of dopamine, and the a-adrenergic receptor antagonists phentolamine and phenoxybenzamine neutralized the effect of norepinephrine, whereas the beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist propranolol had limited to no effect. Finally, pretreatment of pathogenic V. campbellii with catecholamines significantly increased its virulence toward giant freshwater prawn larvae. However, the impact of catecholamine receptor antagonists on in vivo virulence was less clear-cut when compared to the in vitro experiments. In summary, our results show that - similar to enteric pathogens - catecholamines also increase the virulence of vibrios that are pathogenic to aquatic organisms by increasing motility and growth in media containing serum.},
  author       = {Sasmita Julyantoro, Pande Gde and Nguyen, Thao Suong and Bossier, Peter and Defoirdt, Tom},
  issn         = {0168-6496},
  journal      = {FEMS MICROBIOLOGY ECOLOGY},
  keyword      = {microbial endocrinology,host-microbe interaction,vibriosis,WATER GIANT PRAWN,ENTEROHEMORRHAGIC ESCHERICHIA-COLI,QUORUM SENSING SIGNALS,MACROBRACHIUM-ROSENBERGII,MICROBIAL ENDOCRINOLOGY,ARTEMIA-FRANCISCANA,SALMONELLA-ENTERICA,HARVEYI,GROWTH,INVOLVEMENT},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {761--769},
  title        = {The catecholamine stress hormones norepinephrine and dopamine increase the virulence of pathogenic Vibrio anguillarum and Vibrio campbellii},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1574-6941.12432},
  volume       = {90},
  year         = {2014},
}

Chicago
Sasmita Julyantoro, Pande Gde, Thao Suong Nguyen, Peter Bossier, and Tom Defoirdt. 2014. “The Catecholamine Stress Hormones Norepinephrine and Dopamine Increase the Virulence of Pathogenic Vibrio Anguillarum and Vibrio Campbellii.” Fems Microbiology Ecology 90 (3): 761–769.
APA
Sasmita Julyantoro, P. G., Nguyen, T. S., Bossier, P., & Defoirdt, T. (2014). The catecholamine stress hormones norepinephrine and dopamine increase the virulence of pathogenic Vibrio anguillarum and Vibrio campbellii. FEMS MICROBIOLOGY ECOLOGY, 90(3), 761–769.
Vancouver
1.
Sasmita Julyantoro PG, Nguyen TS, Bossier P, Defoirdt T. The catecholamine stress hormones norepinephrine and dopamine increase the virulence of pathogenic Vibrio anguillarum and Vibrio campbellii. FEMS MICROBIOLOGY ECOLOGY. 2014;90(3):761–9.
MLA
Sasmita Julyantoro, Pande Gde, Thao Suong Nguyen, Peter Bossier, et al. “The Catecholamine Stress Hormones Norepinephrine and Dopamine Increase the Virulence of Pathogenic Vibrio Anguillarum and Vibrio Campbellii.” FEMS MICROBIOLOGY ECOLOGY 90.3 (2014): 761–769. Print.