Advanced search
1 file | 330.13 KB

Sexual differences in exploration behavior in Xenopus tropicalis?

(2015) JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL BIOLOGY. 218(11). p.1733-1739
Author
Organization
Abstract
The two sexes of a species often differ in many ways. How sexes differ depends on the selective context, with females often investing more in reproductive output and males in territory defense and resource acquisition. This also implies that behavioral strategies may differ between the two sexes, allowing them to optimize their fitness in a given ecological context. Here, we investigated whether males and females differ in their exploration behavior in an aquatic frog (Xenopus tropicalis). Moreover, we explored whether females show different behavioral strategies in the exploration of a novel environment as has been demonstrated previously for males of the same species. Our results show significant sex differences, with males exploring their environment more than females. Yet, similar to males, female exploratory behavior varied significantly among individuals and broadly fell into three categories: shy, intermediate and bold. Moreover, like in males, behavioral strategies are decoupled from morphology and performance. Our results suggest that females are more sedentary than males, with males engaging in greater risk taking by exploring novel environments more. Male and female behaviors could, however, be classified into similar groups, with some individuals being bolder than others and displaying more exploration behavior. The decoupling of morphology and performance from behavior appears to be a general feature in the species and may allow selection to act on both types of traits independently.
Keywords
Locomotion, Performance, Sexual dimorphism, SIZE DIMORPHISM, GREAT TITS, LOCOMOTOR PERFORMANCE, SELECTION, PERSONALITIES, PARUS-MAJOR, REALIZED HERITABILITY, 3-SPINED STICKLEBACK, EVOLUTION, Morphology, BOLDNESS, Frog

Downloads

  • Videlier et al 2015 J Exp Biol.pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • open access
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 330.13 KB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Videlier, Mathieu, Raphaël Cornette, Camille Bonneaud, and Anthony Herrel. 2015. “Sexual Differences in Exploration Behavior in Xenopus Tropicalis?” Journal of Experimental Biology 218 (11): 1733–1739.
APA
Videlier, M., Cornette, R., Bonneaud, C., & Herrel, A. (2015). Sexual differences in exploration behavior in Xenopus tropicalis? JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL BIOLOGY, 218(11), 1733–1739.
Vancouver
1.
Videlier M, Cornette R, Bonneaud C, Herrel A. Sexual differences in exploration behavior in Xenopus tropicalis? JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL BIOLOGY. 2015;218(11):1733–9.
MLA
Videlier, Mathieu, Raphaël Cornette, Camille Bonneaud, et al. “Sexual Differences in Exploration Behavior in Xenopus Tropicalis?” JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL BIOLOGY 218.11 (2015): 1733–1739. Print.
@article{5964546,
  abstract     = {The two sexes of a species often differ in many ways. How sexes differ depends on the selective context, with females often investing more in reproductive output and males in territory defense and resource acquisition. This also implies that behavioral strategies may differ between the two sexes, allowing them to optimize their fitness in a given ecological context. Here, we investigated whether males and females differ in their exploration behavior in an aquatic frog (Xenopus tropicalis). Moreover, we explored whether females show different behavioral strategies in the exploration of a novel environment as has been demonstrated previously for males of the same species. Our results show significant sex differences, with males exploring their environment more than females. Yet, similar to males, female exploratory behavior varied significantly among individuals and broadly fell into three categories: shy, intermediate and bold. Moreover, like in males, behavioral strategies are decoupled from morphology and performance. Our results suggest that females are more sedentary than males, with males engaging in greater risk taking by exploring novel environments more. Male and female behaviors could, however, be classified into similar groups, with some individuals being bolder than others and displaying more exploration behavior. The decoupling of morphology and performance from behavior appears to be a general feature in the species and may allow selection to act on both types of traits independently.},
  author       = {Videlier, Mathieu and Cornette, Rapha{\"e}l and Bonneaud, Camille and Herrel, Anthony},
  issn         = {0022-0949},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL BIOLOGY},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {11},
  pages        = {1733--1739},
  title        = {Sexual differences in exploration behavior in Xenopus tropicalis?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jeb.120618},
  volume       = {218},
  year         = {2015},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric
Web of Science
Times cited: