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Sound production in Onuxodon fowleri (Carapidae) and its amplification by the host shell

(2014) JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL BIOLOGY. 217(24). p.4283-4294
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Abstract
Onuxodon species are well known for living inside pearl oysters. As in other carapids, their anatomy highlights their ability to make sounds but sound production has never been documented in Onuxodon. This paper describes sound production in Onuxodon fowleri as well as the anatomy of the sound production apparatus. Single-pulsed sounds and multiple-pulsed sounds that sometimes last more than 3 s were recorded in the field and in captivity (Makemo Island, French Polynesia). These pulses are characterized by a broadband frequency spectrum from 100 to 1000 Hz. Onuxodon fowleri is mainly characterized by its ability to modulate the pulse period, meaning that this species can produce pulsed sounds and tonal-like sounds using the same mechanism. In addition, the sound can be remarkably amplified by the shell cavity (peak gain can exceed 10 dB for some frequencies). The sonic apparatus of O. fowleri is characterized by a rocker bone in front of the swimbladder, modified vertebrae and epineurals, and two pairs of sonic muscles, one of which (primary sonic muscle) inserts on the rocker bone. The latter structure, which is absent in other carapid genera, appears to be sexually dimorphic suggesting differences in sound production in males and females. Sound production in O. fowleri could be an example of adaptation where an animal exploits features of its environment to enhance communication.
Keywords
behaviour, locomotion, dispersal, mobility, Anura, :GREAT TITS, REALIZED HERITABILITY, BEHAVIORAL SYNDROMES, BIRD POPULATION, PARUS-MAJOR, TRADE-OFFS, PERSONALITY, WILD, CONSEQUENCES, DISPERSAL

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Citation

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MLA
Kéver, Loïc et al. “Sound Production in Onuxodon Fowleri (Carapidae) and Its Amplification by the Host Shell.” JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL BIOLOGY 217.24 (2014): 4283–4294. Print.
APA
Kéver, L., Colleye, O., Lugli, M., Lecchini, D., Lerouvreur, F., Herrel, A., & Parmentier, E. (2014). Sound production in Onuxodon fowleri (Carapidae) and its amplification by the host shell. JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL BIOLOGY, 217(24), 4283–4294.
Chicago author-date
Kéver, Loïc, Orphal Colleye, Marco Lugli, David Lecchini, Franck Lerouvreur, Anthony Herrel, and Eric Parmentier. 2014. “Sound Production in Onuxodon Fowleri (Carapidae) and Its Amplification by the Host Shell.” Journal of Experimental Biology 217 (24): 4283–4294.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Kéver, Loïc, Orphal Colleye, Marco Lugli, David Lecchini, Franck Lerouvreur, Anthony Herrel, and Eric Parmentier. 2014. “Sound Production in Onuxodon Fowleri (Carapidae) and Its Amplification by the Host Shell.” Journal of Experimental Biology 217 (24): 4283–4294.
Vancouver
1.
Kéver L, Colleye O, Lugli M, Lecchini D, Lerouvreur F, Herrel A, et al. Sound production in Onuxodon fowleri (Carapidae) and its amplification by the host shell. JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL BIOLOGY. 2014;217(24):4283–94.
IEEE
[1]
L. Kéver et al., “Sound production in Onuxodon fowleri (Carapidae) and its amplification by the host shell,” JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL BIOLOGY, vol. 217, no. 24, pp. 4283–4294, 2014.
@article{5964420,
  abstract     = {{Onuxodon species are well known for living inside pearl oysters. As in other carapids, their anatomy highlights their ability to make sounds but sound production has never been documented in Onuxodon. This paper describes sound production in Onuxodon fowleri as well as the anatomy of the sound production apparatus. Single-pulsed sounds and multiple-pulsed sounds that sometimes last more than 3 s were recorded in the field and in captivity (Makemo Island, French Polynesia). These pulses are characterized by a broadband frequency spectrum from 100 to 1000 Hz. Onuxodon fowleri is mainly characterized by its ability to modulate the pulse period, meaning that this species can produce pulsed sounds and tonal-like sounds using the same mechanism. In addition, the sound can be remarkably amplified by the shell cavity (peak gain can exceed 10 dB for some frequencies). The sonic apparatus of O. fowleri is characterized by a rocker bone in front of the swimbladder, modified vertebrae and epineurals, and two pairs of sonic muscles, one of which (primary sonic muscle) inserts on the rocker bone. The latter structure, which is absent in other carapid genera, appears to be sexually dimorphic suggesting differences in sound production in males and females. Sound production in O. fowleri could be an example of adaptation where an animal exploits features of its environment to enhance communication.}},
  author       = {{Kéver, Loïc and Colleye, Orphal and Lugli, Marco and Lecchini, David and Lerouvreur, Franck and Herrel, Anthony and Parmentier, Eric}},
  issn         = {{0022-0949}},
  journal      = {{JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL BIOLOGY}},
  keywords     = {{behaviour,locomotion,dispersal,mobility,Anura,:GREAT TITS,REALIZED HERITABILITY,BEHAVIORAL SYNDROMES,BIRD POPULATION,PARUS-MAJOR,TRADE-OFFS,PERSONALITY,WILD,CONSEQUENCES,DISPERSAL}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  number       = {{24}},
  pages        = {{4283--4294}},
  title        = {{Sound production in Onuxodon fowleri (Carapidae) and its amplification by the host shell}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jeb.109363}},
  volume       = {{217}},
  year         = {{2014}},
}

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