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Do employer preferences contribute to sticky floors?

(2016) ILR REVIEW. 69(3). p.714-736
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Abstract
We investigate the importance of employer preferences in explaining Sticky Floors, the pattern that women are, compared to men, less likely to start to climb the job ladder. To this end we perform a randomised field experiment in the Belgian labour market and test whether hiring discrimination based on gender is heterogeneous by whether or not jobs imply a promotion (in comparison with employees’ current position). We find that women get 33% less interview invitations when they apply for jobs implying a first promotion in functional level. On the other hand, their hiring chances are not significantly affected by the job authority level of the job.
Keywords
Gender discrimination, Sticky floors, Hiring discrimination, Labour market transitions, European labour markets., GENDER WAGE GAP, LABOR-MARKET, FIELD EXPERIMENT, GLASS CEILINGS, HIRING DISCRIMINATION, SEX-DISCRIMINATION, WOMEN, JOB, DIFFERENTIALS, SEGREGATION

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Baert, Stijn, Ann-Sophie De Pauw, and Nick Deschacht. 2016. “Do Employer Preferences Contribute to Sticky Floors?” Ilr Review 69 (3): 714–736.
APA
Baert, Stijn, De Pauw, A.-S., & Deschacht, N. (2016). Do employer preferences contribute to sticky floors? ILR REVIEW, 69(3), 714–736.
Vancouver
1.
Baert S, De Pauw A-S, Deschacht N. Do employer preferences contribute to sticky floors? ILR REVIEW. 2016;69(3):714–36.
MLA
Baert, Stijn, Ann-Sophie De Pauw, and Nick Deschacht. “Do Employer Preferences Contribute to Sticky Floors?” ILR REVIEW 69.3 (2016): 714–736. Print.
@article{5960457,
  abstract     = {We investigate the importance of employer preferences in explaining Sticky Floors, the pattern that women are, compared to men, less likely to start to climb the job ladder. To this end we perform a randomised field experiment in the Belgian labour market and test whether hiring discrimination based on gender is heterogeneous by whether or not jobs imply a promotion (in comparison with employees{\textquoteright} current position). We find that women get 33\% less interview invitations when they apply for jobs implying a first promotion in functional level. On the other hand, their hiring chances are not significantly affected by the job authority level of the job.},
  author       = {Baert, Stijn and De Pauw, Ann-Sophie and Deschacht, Nick},
  issn         = {0019-7939},
  journal      = {ILR REVIEW},
  keyword      = {Gender discrimination,Sticky floors,Hiring discrimination,Labour market transitions,European labour markets.,GENDER WAGE GAP,LABOR-MARKET,FIELD EXPERIMENT,GLASS CEILINGS,HIRING DISCRIMINATION,SEX-DISCRIMINATION,WOMEN,JOB,DIFFERENTIALS,SEGREGATION},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {714--736},
  title        = {Do employer preferences contribute to sticky floors?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0019793915625213},
  volume       = {69},
  year         = {2016},
}

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