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What are the most important tasks of tutors during the tutorials in hybrid problem-based learning curricula?

Ruth Boelens (UGent) , Bram De Wever (UGent) , Yves Rosseel (UGent) , Alain Verstraete (UGent) and Anselme Derese (UGent)
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Abstract
Background. In problem-based learning, a tutor, the quality of the problems and group functioning play a central role in stimulating student learning. This study is conducted in a hybrid medical curriculum where problem-based learning is one of the pedagogical approaches. The aim of this study was to examine which tutor tasks are the most important during the tutorial sessions and thus should be promoted in hybrid (and in maybe all) problem-based learning curricula in higher education. Methods. A student (N = 333) questionnaire was used to obtain data about the problem-based learning process, combined with the achievement score of the students on a multiple-choice exam. Structural equation modeling was used to test the fit of different models (two existing models and a new simplified model) representing the factors of interest and their relationships, in order to determine which tutor characteristics are the most important in the present study. Results. A new simplified model is presented, which demonstrates that stimulation of active and self-directed learning by tutors enhances the perceived case quality and the perceived group functioning. There was no significant effect between the stimulation of collaborative learning and perceived group functioning. In addition, group functioning was not a significant predictor for achievement. Conclusions. We found that stimulating active and self-directed learning are perceived as tutors’ most important tasks with regard to perceived case quality and group functioning. It is necessary to train and teach tutors how they can stimulate active and self-directed learning by students.
Keywords
Problem-based learning, R PACKAGE, tutor roles, PBL, RELIABILITY, STUDENTS

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Chicago
Boelens, Ruth, Bram De Wever, Yves Rosseel, Alain Verstraete, and Anselme Derese. 2015. “What Are the Most Important Tasks of Tutors During the Tutorials in Hybrid Problem-based Learning Curricula?” Bmc Medical Education 15.
APA
Boelens, R., De Wever, B., Rosseel, Y., Verstraete, A., & Derese, A. (2015). What are the most important tasks of tutors during the tutorials in hybrid problem-based learning curricula? BMC MEDICAL EDUCATION, 15.
Vancouver
1.
Boelens R, De Wever B, Rosseel Y, Verstraete A, Derese A. What are the most important tasks of tutors during the tutorials in hybrid problem-based learning curricula? BMC MEDICAL EDUCATION. 2015;15.
MLA
Boelens, Ruth, Bram De Wever, Yves Rosseel, et al. “What Are the Most Important Tasks of Tutors During the Tutorials in Hybrid Problem-based Learning Curricula?” BMC MEDICAL EDUCATION 15 (2015): n. pag. Print.
@article{5956118,
  abstract     = {Background. In problem-based learning, a tutor, the quality of the problems and group functioning play a central role in stimulating student learning. This study is conducted in a hybrid medical curriculum where problem-based learning is one of the pedagogical approaches. The aim of this study was to examine which tutor tasks are the most important during the tutorial sessions and thus should be promoted in hybrid (and in maybe all) problem-based learning curricula in higher education.

Methods. A student (N\,=\,333) questionnaire was used to obtain data about the problem-based learning process, combined with the achievement score of the students on a multiple-choice exam. Structural equation modeling was used to test the fit of different models (two existing models and a new simplified model) representing the factors of interest and their relationships, in order to determine which tutor characteristics are the most important in the present study.

Results. A new simplified model is presented, which demonstrates that stimulation of active and self-directed learning by tutors enhances the perceived case quality and the perceived group functioning. There was no significant effect between the stimulation of collaborative learning and perceived group functioning. In addition, group functioning was not a significant predictor for achievement.

Conclusions. We found that stimulating active and self-directed learning are perceived as tutors{\textquoteright} most important tasks with regard to perceived case quality and group functioning. It is necessary to train and teach tutors how they can stimulate active and self-directed learning by students.},
  articleno    = {84},
  author       = {Boelens, Ruth and De Wever, Bram and Rosseel, Yves and Verstraete, Alain and Derese, Anselme},
  issn         = {1472-6920},
  journal      = {BMC MEDICAL EDUCATION},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {8},
  title        = {What are the most important tasks of tutors during the tutorials in hybrid problem-based learning curricula?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12909-015-0368-4},
  volume       = {15},
  year         = {2015},
}

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