Advanced search
1 file | 479.31 KB Add to list

Decreasing initial telomere length in humans intergenerationally understates age-associated telomere shortening

(2015) AGING CELL. 14(4). p.669-677
Author
Organization
Abstract
Telomere length shortens with aging, and short telomeres have been linked to a wide variety of pathologies. Previous studies suggested a discrepancy in age-associated telomere shortening rate estimated by cross-sectional studies versus the rate measured in longitudinal studies, indicating a potential bias in cross-sectional estimates. Intergenerational changes in initial telomere length, such as that predicted by the previously described effect of a father's age at birth of his offspring (FAB), could explain the discrepancy in shortening rate measurements. We evaluated whether changes occur in initial telomere length over multiple generations in three large datasets and identified paternal birth year (PBY) as a variable that reconciles the difference between longitudinal and cross-sectional measurements. We also clarify the association between FAB and offspring telomere length, demonstrating that this effect is substantially larger than reported in the past. These results indicate the presence of a downward secular trend in telomere length at birth over generational time with potential public health implications.
Keywords
genetics, aging, human, parental effects, secular trend, telomeres, telomerase, telomere length, PATERNAL AGE, DYSKERATOSIS-CONGENITA, LONGITUDINAL FINDINGS, DISEASE, HEART, POLLUTION, EXPOSURE, CHILDREN, TISSUES, DESIGN

Downloads

  • Holohan et al-2015-Aging Cell.pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • open access
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 479.31 KB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Holohan, Brody et al. “Decreasing Initial Telomere Length in Humans Intergenerationally Understates Age-associated Telomere Shortening.” AGING CELL 14.4 (2015): 669–677. Print.
APA
Holohan, B., De Meyer, T., Batten, K., Mangino, M., Hunt, S. C., Bekaert, S., De Buyzere, M., et al. (2015). Decreasing initial telomere length in humans intergenerationally understates age-associated telomere shortening. AGING CELL, 14(4), 669–677.
Chicago author-date
Holohan, Brody, Tim De Meyer, Kimberly Batten, Massimo Mangino, Steven C Hunt, Sofie Bekaert, Marc De Buyzere, et al. 2015. “Decreasing Initial Telomere Length in Humans Intergenerationally Understates Age-associated Telomere Shortening.” Aging Cell 14 (4): 669–677.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Holohan, Brody, Tim De Meyer, Kimberly Batten, Massimo Mangino, Steven C Hunt, Sofie Bekaert, Marc De Buyzere, Ernst Rietzschel, Tim D Spector, Woodring E Wright, and Jerry W Shay. 2015. “Decreasing Initial Telomere Length in Humans Intergenerationally Understates Age-associated Telomere Shortening.” Aging Cell 14 (4): 669–677.
Vancouver
1.
Holohan B, De Meyer T, Batten K, Mangino M, Hunt SC, Bekaert S, et al. Decreasing initial telomere length in humans intergenerationally understates age-associated telomere shortening. AGING CELL. 2015;14(4):669–77.
IEEE
[1]
B. Holohan et al., “Decreasing initial telomere length in humans intergenerationally understates age-associated telomere shortening,” AGING CELL, vol. 14, no. 4, pp. 669–677, 2015.
@article{5953339,
  abstract     = {Telomere length shortens with aging, and short telomeres have been linked to a wide variety of pathologies. Previous studies suggested a discrepancy in age-associated telomere shortening rate estimated by cross-sectional studies versus the rate measured in longitudinal studies, indicating a potential bias in cross-sectional estimates. Intergenerational changes in initial telomere length, such as that predicted by the previously described effect of a father's age at birth of his offspring (FAB), could explain the discrepancy in shortening rate measurements. We evaluated whether changes occur in initial telomere length over multiple generations in three large datasets and identified paternal birth year (PBY) as a variable that reconciles the difference between longitudinal and cross-sectional measurements. We also clarify the association between FAB and offspring telomere length, demonstrating that this effect is substantially larger than reported in the past. These results indicate the presence of a downward secular trend in telomere length at birth over generational time with potential public health implications.},
  author       = {Holohan, Brody and De Meyer, Tim and Batten, Kimberly and Mangino, Massimo and Hunt, Steven C and Bekaert, Sofie and De Buyzere, Marc and Rietzschel, Ernst and Spector, Tim D and Wright, Woodring E and Shay, Jerry W},
  issn         = {1474-9718},
  journal      = {AGING CELL},
  keywords     = {genetics,aging,human,parental effects,secular trend,telomeres,telomerase,telomere length,PATERNAL AGE,DYSKERATOSIS-CONGENITA,LONGITUDINAL FINDINGS,DISEASE,HEART,POLLUTION,EXPOSURE,CHILDREN,TISSUES,DESIGN},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {669--677},
  title        = {Decreasing initial telomere length in humans intergenerationally understates age-associated telomere shortening},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/acel.12347},
  volume       = {14},
  year         = {2015},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric
Web of Science
Times cited: