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Are girls more impervious to pressure for gender conformity than boys? The association between pressure for gender conformity and academic self-efficacy.

Wendelien Vantieghem (UGent) , Ellen Huyge (UGent) and Mieke Van Houtte (UGent)
Author
Organization
Abstract
Since the nineties, it has become clear that in most western industrialized countries girls tend to outperform boys on educational parameters. Masculinities theory proposes that cultural conventions concerning typical masculinity and femininity inform gendered study cultures, which lead to the observed gender-differential achievement patterns. When investigated in a qualitative fashion, the results often are group-based and lack generalizability. When researched in a quantitative fashion, however, gender is frequently reduced to boy-girl differences. In this study, we aim to solve these issues by adopting a thorough gender-focus while using a quantitative method. We do this by investigating the influence of gendered peer cultures on an individual level by employing the concept of pressure for gender conformity. Hence, the central research focus is the gender differential impact of pressure for gender conformity on educational parameters, more specifically academic self-efficacy. We examine these inter- and intrasexual differences in a sample of 6380 7th grade students in Flanders (the northern, Dutch-speaking part of Belgium). The data have been collected at the start and the end of the school year 2012-2013. Results from multilevel regression analysis of two time-points show that boys’ academic self-efficacy is lower when experiencing more pressure for gender conformity. Girls’ academic self-efficacy, however, does not tend to decline when experiencing similar levels of pressure. Moreover, this impact of pressure for gender conformity only appears in the course of the first year of secondary education. The results are discussed in light of gendered expectations for boys and girls.
Keywords
academic self-efficacy, pressure for gender conformity

Citation

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Chicago
Vantieghem, Wendelien, Ellen Huyge, and Mieke Van Houtte. 2015. “Are Girls More Impervious to Pressure for Gender Conformity Than Boys? The Association Between Pressure for Gender Conformity and Academic Self-efficacy.” In Annual Meeting American Educational Research Association, Abstracts.
APA
Vantieghem, W., Huyge, E., & Van Houtte, M. (2015). Are girls more impervious to pressure for gender conformity than boys? The association between pressure for gender conformity and academic self-efficacy. Annual Meeting American Educational Research Association, Abstracts. Presented at the Annual Meeting American Educational Research Association.
Vancouver
1.
Vantieghem W, Huyge E, Van Houtte M. Are girls more impervious to pressure for gender conformity than boys? The association between pressure for gender conformity and academic self-efficacy. Annual Meeting American Educational Research Association, Abstracts. 2015.
MLA
Vantieghem, Wendelien, Ellen Huyge, and Mieke Van Houtte. “Are Girls More Impervious to Pressure for Gender Conformity Than Boys? The Association Between Pressure for Gender Conformity and Academic Self-efficacy.” Annual Meeting American Educational Research Association, Abstracts. 2015. Print.
@inproceedings{5951339,
  abstract     = {Since the nineties, it has become clear that in most western industrialized countries girls tend to outperform boys on educational parameters. Masculinities theory proposes that cultural conventions concerning typical masculinity and femininity inform gendered study cultures, which lead to the observed gender-differential achievement patterns. When investigated in a qualitative fashion, the results often are group-based and lack generalizability. When researched in a quantitative fashion, however, gender is frequently reduced to boy-girl differences. In this study, we aim to solve these issues by adopting a thorough gender-focus while using a quantitative method. We do this by investigating the influence of gendered peer cultures on an individual level by employing the concept of pressure for gender conformity. Hence, the central research focus is the gender differential impact of pressure for gender conformity on educational parameters, more specifically academic self-efficacy. We examine these inter- and intrasexual differences in a sample of 6380 7th grade students in Flanders (the northern, Dutch-speaking part of Belgium). The data have been collected at the start and the end of the school year 2012-2013. Results from multilevel regression analysis of two time-points show that boys{\textquoteright} academic self-efficacy is lower when experiencing more pressure for gender conformity. Girls{\textquoteright} academic self-efficacy, however, does not tend to decline when experiencing similar levels of pressure. Moreover, this impact of pressure for gender conformity only appears in the course of the first year of secondary education. The results are discussed in light of gendered expectations for boys and girls.},
  author       = {Vantieghem, Wendelien and Huyge, Ellen and Van Houtte, Mieke},
  booktitle    = {Annual Meeting American Educational Research Association, Abstracts},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Chicago, US},
  title        = {Are girls more impervious to pressure for gender conformity than boys? The association between pressure for gender conformity and academic self-efficacy.},
  year         = {2015},
}