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Do attitudes toward school influence the underachievement of Turkish and Moroccan minority students in Flanders? The attitude-achievement paradox revisited

Fanny D'hondt (UGent) , Lore Van Praag (UGent) , Peter Stevens (UGent) and Mieke Van Houtte (UGent)
(2015) COMPARATIVE EDUCATION REVIEW. 59(2). p.332-354
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Abstract
While many ethnic minority students underachieve compared with their ethnic majority peers, they often hold very positive school attitudes. Mickelson (1990) explained this attitude-achievement paradox by the existence of a double set of attitudes. Abstract attitudes reflect the dominant ideas about schooling, while concrete attitudes refer to a person's perceptions of reality and originate from the educational benefits people expect to obtain on the labor market. According to Mickelson, only students' concrete attitudes influence achievement. Applying Mickelson's theory in Flanders, regarding students of Turkish and Moroccan descent, we could not find evidence that abstract and concrete attitudes play a role in the achievement of ethnic minority students. Qualitative research suggests that this could be due to distinct interpretations of success and ways of dealing with perceived constraints. This contrasts with ethnic majority students, who are more likely to end the school year unsuccessfully if they hold pessimistic concrete attitudes.
Keywords
I DONT, OPPOSITIONAL CULTURE EXPLANATION, PERFORMANCE, ADOLESCENTS, EDUCATION, OPTIMISM, 2ND-GENERATION, PERSPECTIVE, FUTILITY, BELGIUM

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MLA
D’hondt, Fanny et al. “Do Attitudes Toward School Influence the Underachievement of Turkish and Moroccan Minority Students in Flanders? The Attitude-achievement Paradox Revisited.” COMPARATIVE EDUCATION REVIEW 59.2 (2015): 332–354. Print.
APA
D’hondt, F., Van Praag, L., Stevens, P., & Van Houtte, M. (2015). Do attitudes toward school influence the underachievement of Turkish and Moroccan minority students in Flanders? The attitude-achievement paradox revisited. COMPARATIVE EDUCATION REVIEW, 59(2), 332–354.
Chicago author-date
D’hondt, Fanny, Lore Van Praag, Peter Stevens, and Mieke Van Houtte. 2015. “Do Attitudes Toward School Influence the Underachievement of Turkish and Moroccan Minority Students in Flanders? The Attitude-achievement Paradox Revisited.” Comparative Education Review 59 (2): 332–354.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
D’hondt, Fanny, Lore Van Praag, Peter Stevens, and Mieke Van Houtte. 2015. “Do Attitudes Toward School Influence the Underachievement of Turkish and Moroccan Minority Students in Flanders? The Attitude-achievement Paradox Revisited.” Comparative Education Review 59 (2): 332–354.
Vancouver
1.
D’hondt F, Van Praag L, Stevens P, Van Houtte M. Do attitudes toward school influence the underachievement of Turkish and Moroccan minority students in Flanders? The attitude-achievement paradox revisited. COMPARATIVE EDUCATION REVIEW. 2015;59(2):332–54.
IEEE
[1]
F. D’hondt, L. Van Praag, P. Stevens, and M. Van Houtte, “Do attitudes toward school influence the underachievement of Turkish and Moroccan minority students in Flanders? The attitude-achievement paradox revisited,” COMPARATIVE EDUCATION REVIEW, vol. 59, no. 2, pp. 332–354, 2015.
@article{5951127,
  abstract     = {While many ethnic minority students underachieve compared with their ethnic majority peers, they often hold very positive school attitudes. Mickelson (1990) explained this attitude-achievement paradox by the existence of a double set of attitudes. Abstract attitudes reflect the dominant ideas about schooling, while concrete attitudes refer to a person's perceptions of reality and originate from the educational benefits people expect to obtain on the labor market. According to Mickelson, only students' concrete attitudes influence achievement. Applying Mickelson's theory in Flanders, regarding students of Turkish and Moroccan descent, we could not find evidence that abstract and concrete attitudes play a role in the achievement of ethnic minority students. Qualitative research suggests that this could be due to distinct interpretations of success and ways of dealing with perceived constraints. This contrasts with ethnic majority students, who are more likely to end the school year unsuccessfully if they hold pessimistic concrete attitudes.},
  author       = {D'hondt, Fanny and Van Praag, Lore and Stevens, Peter and Van Houtte, Mieke},
  issn         = {0010-4086},
  journal      = {COMPARATIVE EDUCATION REVIEW},
  keywords     = {I DONT,OPPOSITIONAL CULTURE EXPLANATION,PERFORMANCE,ADOLESCENTS,EDUCATION,OPTIMISM,2ND-GENERATION,PERSPECTIVE,FUTILITY,BELGIUM},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {332--354},
  title        = {Do attitudes toward school influence the underachievement of Turkish and Moroccan minority students in Flanders? The attitude-achievement paradox revisited},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/680171},
  volume       = {59},
  year         = {2015},
}

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