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Human resource architectures for new teachers in Flemish primary education

Eva Vekeman UGent, Geert Devos UGent and Martin Valcke UGent (2016) EDUCATIONAL MANAGEMENT ADMINISTRATION & LEADERSHIP. 44(6). p.970-995
abstract
Since research shows that the quality of a school's teaching force is related to its personnel practices, there is a growing interest in human resource management (HRM) in education. Existing research has generated insights into the differences, constraints and effects of single and isolated HR practices. Yet, little research is available examining bundles of HR practices (that is, HR architecture) from a principal's perspective. This article investigates how and why HR architectures for new teachers are configured by principals by looking at the ways principals make sense of hiring, induction and tenure practices. The analysis is based on semi-structured interviews with 54 primary school principals in Flanders (Belgium). After coding the interview transcripts using descriptive categories, the transcripts were coded based on principal's strategic orientation and human resource orientation. Looking at the differences and commonalities in these orientations, four HR architectures were identified: an administrative, a developmental, a strategic and a strategic-developmental HR architecture. These architectures showed that only a minority of principals configure bundles of HR practices for new teachers strategically. Moreover, they point to a disharmony in principals' beliefs regarding how new teachers should be managed. Differences between these four HR architectures can be found in the extent to which principals perceive and cope with external challenges. Suggestions for further research, limitations and implications of this study are discussed.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
POLICY IMPLEMENTATION, BEGINNING TEACHERS, SCHOOLS, MANAGEMENT, PRINCIPALS, RETENTION, IMPACT, ORGANIZATIONS, INFORMATION, ACHIEVEMENT, HR Architectures, human resource management, new teachers, primary education, school principals
journal title
EDUCATIONAL MANAGEMENT ADMINISTRATION & LEADERSHIP
volume
44
issue
6
pages
970 - 995
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000387364800007
JCR category
EDUCATION & EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH
JCR impact factor
0.982 (2016)
JCR rank
133/235 (2016)
JCR quartile
3 (2016)
ISSN
1741-1432
DOI
10.1177/1741143215587309
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
5946505
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-5946505
date created
2015-04-29 13:57:22
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:48:37
@article{5946505,
  abstract     = {Since research shows that the quality of a school's teaching force is related to its personnel practices, there is a growing interest in human resource management (HRM) in education. Existing research has generated insights into the differences, constraints and effects of single and isolated HR practices. Yet, little research is available examining bundles of HR practices (that is, HR architecture) from a principal's perspective. This article investigates how and why HR architectures for new teachers are configured by principals by looking at the ways principals make sense of hiring, induction and tenure practices. The analysis is based on semi-structured interviews with 54 primary school principals in Flanders (Belgium). After coding the interview transcripts using descriptive categories, the transcripts were coded based on principal's strategic orientation and human resource orientation. Looking at the differences and commonalities in these orientations, four HR architectures were identified: an administrative, a developmental, a strategic and a strategic-developmental HR architecture. These architectures showed that only a minority of principals configure bundles of HR practices for new teachers strategically. Moreover, they point to a disharmony in principals' beliefs regarding how new teachers should be managed. Differences between these four HR architectures can be found in the extent to which principals perceive and cope with external challenges. Suggestions for further research, limitations and implications of this study are discussed.},
  author       = {Vekeman, Eva and Devos, Geert and Valcke, Martin},
  issn         = {1741-1432},
  journal      = {EDUCATIONAL MANAGEMENT ADMINISTRATION \& LEADERSHIP},
  keyword      = {POLICY IMPLEMENTATION,BEGINNING TEACHERS,SCHOOLS,MANAGEMENT,PRINCIPALS,RETENTION,IMPACT,ORGANIZATIONS,INFORMATION,ACHIEVEMENT,HR Architectures,human resource management,new teachers,primary education,school principals},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {970--995},
  title        = {Human resource architectures for new teachers in Flemish primary education},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1741143215587309},
  volume       = {44},
  year         = {2016},
}

Chicago
Vekeman, Eva, Geert Devos, and Martin Valcke. 2016. “Human Resource Architectures for New Teachers in Flemish Primary Education.” Educational Management Administration & Leadership 44 (6): 970–995.
APA
Vekeman, E., Devos, G., & Valcke, M. (2016). Human resource architectures for new teachers in Flemish primary education. EDUCATIONAL MANAGEMENT ADMINISTRATION & LEADERSHIP, 44(6), 970–995.
Vancouver
1.
Vekeman E, Devos G, Valcke M. Human resource architectures for new teachers in Flemish primary education. EDUCATIONAL MANAGEMENT ADMINISTRATION & LEADERSHIP. 2016;44(6):970–95.
MLA
Vekeman, Eva, Geert Devos, and Martin Valcke. “Human Resource Architectures for New Teachers in Flemish Primary Education.” EDUCATIONAL MANAGEMENT ADMINISTRATION & LEADERSHIP 44.6 (2016): 970–995. Print.