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Ready-to-eat cereals improve nutrient, milk and fruit intake at breakfast in European adolescents

(2016) EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF NUTRITION. 55(2). p.771-779
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Abstract
Breakfast consumption has been recommended as part of a healthy diet. Recently, ready-to-eat cereals (RTEC) became more popular as a breakfast item. Our aim was to analyse the dietary characteristics of an RTEC breakfast in European adolescents and to compare them with other breakfast options. From the European multi-centre HELENA study, two 24-h dietary recalls of 3137 adolescents were available. Food items (RTEC or bread, milk/yoghurt, fruit) and macro- and micronutrient intakes at breakfast were calculated. Cross-sectional regression analyses were adjusted for gender, age, socio-economic status and city. Compared to bread breakfasts (39 %) and all other breakfasts (41.5 %), RTEC breakfast (19.5 %) was associated with improved nutrient intake (less fat and less sucrose; more fibre, protein and some micronutrients like vitamin B, calcium, magnesium and phosphorus) at the breakfast occasion. Exceptions were more simple sugars in RTEC breakfast consumers: more lactose and galactose due to increased milk consumption, but also higher glucose and fructose than bread consumers. RTEC consumers had a significantly higher frequency (92.5 vs. 50.4 and 60.2 %) and quantity of milk/yoghurt intake and a slightly higher frequency of fruit intake (13.4 vs. 10.9 and 8.0 %) at breakfast. Among European adolescents, RTEC consumers showed a more favourable nutrient intake than consumers of bread or other breakfasts, except for simple sugars. Therefore, RTEC may be regarded as a good breakfast option as part of a varied and balanced diet. Nevertheless, more research is warranted concerning the role of different RTEC types in nutrient intake, especially for simple sugars.
Keywords
Ready-to-eat cereals, Adolescents, Breakfast, Fruit, Milk, Nutrients, HEALTHY LIFE-STYLE, CHILDREN, CONSUMPTION, NUTRITION, QUALITY

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Chicago
Michels, Nathalie, Stefaan De Henauw, Laurent Beghin, Magdalena Cuenca-Garcia, Marcela Gonzalez-Gross, Lena Hallstrom, Anthony Kafatos, et al. 2016. “Ready-to-eat Cereals Improve Nutrient, Milk and Fruit Intake at Breakfast in European Adolescents.” European Journal of Nutrition 55 (2): 771–779.
APA
Michels, N., De Henauw, S., Beghin, L., Cuenca-Garcia, M., Gonzalez-Gross, M., Hallstrom, L., Kafatos, A., et al. (2016). Ready-to-eat cereals improve nutrient, milk and fruit intake at breakfast in European adolescents. EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF NUTRITION, 55(2), 771–779.
Vancouver
1.
Michels N, De Henauw S, Beghin L, Cuenca-Garcia M, Gonzalez-Gross M, Hallstrom L, et al. Ready-to-eat cereals improve nutrient, milk and fruit intake at breakfast in European adolescents. EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF NUTRITION. 2016;55(2):771–9.
MLA
Michels, Nathalie, Stefaan De Henauw, Laurent Beghin, et al. “Ready-to-eat Cereals Improve Nutrient, Milk and Fruit Intake at Breakfast in European Adolescents.” EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF NUTRITION 55.2 (2016): 771–779. Print.
@article{5942380,
  abstract     = {Breakfast consumption has been recommended as part of a healthy diet. Recently, ready-to-eat cereals (RTEC) became more popular as a breakfast item. Our aim was to analyse the dietary characteristics of an RTEC breakfast in European adolescents and to compare them with other breakfast options. 
From the European multi-centre HELENA study, two 24-h dietary recalls of 3137 adolescents were available. Food items (RTEC or bread, milk/yoghurt, fruit) and macro- and micronutrient intakes at breakfast were calculated. Cross-sectional regression analyses were adjusted for gender, age, socio-economic status and city. 
Compared to bread breakfasts (39 \%) and all other breakfasts (41.5 \%), RTEC breakfast (19.5 \%) was associated with improved nutrient intake (less fat and less sucrose; more fibre, protein and some micronutrients like vitamin B, calcium, magnesium and phosphorus) at the breakfast occasion. Exceptions were more simple sugars in RTEC breakfast consumers: more lactose and galactose due to increased milk consumption, but also higher glucose and fructose than bread consumers. RTEC consumers had a significantly higher frequency (92.5 vs. 50.4 and 60.2 \%) and quantity of milk/yoghurt intake and a slightly higher frequency of fruit intake (13.4 vs. 10.9 and 8.0 \%) at breakfast. 
Among European adolescents, RTEC consumers showed a more favourable nutrient intake than consumers of bread or other breakfasts, except for simple sugars. Therefore, RTEC may be regarded as a good breakfast option as part of a varied and balanced diet. Nevertheless, more research is warranted concerning the role of different RTEC types in nutrient intake, especially for simple sugars.},
  author       = {Michels, Nathalie and De Henauw, Stefaan and Beghin, Laurent and Cuenca-Garcia, Magdalena and Gonzalez-Gross, Marcela and Hallstrom, Lena and Kafatos, Anthony and Kersting, Mathilde and Manios, Yannis and Marcos, Ascenci{\'o}n and Molnar, Denes and Roccaldo, Romana and Santaliestra-Pasias, Alba M and Sjostrom, Michael and Reye, B{\'e}atrice and Thielecke, Frank and Widhalm, Kurt and Claessens, Mandy},
  issn         = {1436-6207},
  journal      = {EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF NUTRITION},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {771--779},
  title        = {Ready-to-eat cereals improve nutrient, milk and fruit intake at breakfast in European adolescents},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00394-015-0898-x},
  volume       = {55},
  year         = {2016},
}

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