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Long-term antibody persistence in children after vaccination with the pediatric formulation of an aluminum-free virosomal hepatitis A vaccine

Koen Van Herck UGent, Annick Hens, Ilse De Coster, André Vertruyen, Jeroen Tolboom, Michal Sarnecki and Pierre Van Damme (2015) PEDIATRIC INFECTIOUS DISEASE JOURNAL. 34(4). p.e85-e91
abstract
Background: The pediatric dose of the virosomal hepatitis A vaccine Epaxal (R), Epaxal (R) Junior, is safe and immunogenic in children from 1 to 17 years of age. The present study investigated the long-term immunogenicity of Epaxal (R) Junior. The standard doses of Epaxal (R) and aluminum-adsorbed hepatitis A vaccine (Havrix (R) Junior) were used as comparators. Methods: A total of 271 children who had completed a 0/6-month immunization schedule (priming and booster dose) participated in this follow-up study. Anti-hepatitis A virus (HAV) antibody levels were measured using a microparticle enzyme immunoassay (HAVAB 2.0 Quantitative; Abbott Diagnostics, Wiesbaden, Germany) starting at 18 months following the second dose, and then yearly until 66 months (ie, 5.5 years) after the second dose. Results: All subjects tested at Month 66 still had protective anti-HAV antibodies (>= 10 mIU/mL). Antibody titers were generally lower in subjects 1-7 years old than in subjects 8-17 years old and higher in females 11-17 years old than in males 11-17 years old. In addition, an age-dependent decay was observed, that is, antibody decreased more rapidly in younger than in older children. Conclusions: Vaccination of children with two doses of Epaxal (R) Junior confers a real-time protection of at least 5.5 years. This protection is estimated to last approximately 25 years. Younger children showed lower antibody titers and a faster antibody decline than older children. Additional follow-up studies are needed beyond 5.5 years to further assess the longterm immunogenicity of Epaxal (R) Junior.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
pediatric, long-term protection, virosomes, hepatitis A, RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIAL, AGED 1-16 YEARS, FOLLOW-UP, INACTIVATED VIROSOME, VIRUS-VACCINE, EARLY-LIFE, B VACCINE, IMMUNOGENICITY, PROTECTION, IMMUNITY
journal title
PEDIATRIC INFECTIOUS DISEASE JOURNAL
Pediatr. Infect. Dis. J.
volume
34
issue
4
pages
e85 - e91
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000351007900002
JCR category
PEDIATRICS
JCR impact factor
2.587 (2015)
JCR rank
22/120 (2015)
JCR quartile
1 (2015)
ISSN
0891-3668
DOI
10.1097/INF.0000000000000616
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
5938187
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-5938187
date created
2015-04-20 14:32:43
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:39:30
@article{5938187,
  abstract     = {Background: The pediatric dose of the virosomal hepatitis A vaccine Epaxal (R), Epaxal (R) Junior, is safe and immunogenic in children from 1 to 17 years of age. The present study investigated the long-term immunogenicity of Epaxal (R) Junior. The standard doses of Epaxal (R) and aluminum-adsorbed hepatitis A vaccine (Havrix (R) Junior) were used as comparators. 
Methods: A total of 271 children who had completed a 0/6-month immunization schedule (priming and booster dose) participated in this follow-up study. Anti-hepatitis A virus (HAV) antibody levels were measured using a microparticle enzyme immunoassay (HAVAB 2.0 Quantitative; Abbott Diagnostics, Wiesbaden, Germany) starting at 18 months following the second dose, and then yearly until 66 months (ie, 5.5 years) after the second dose. 
Results: All subjects tested at Month 66 still had protective anti-HAV antibodies ({\textrangle}= 10 mIU/mL). Antibody titers were generally lower in subjects 1-7 years old than in subjects 8-17 years old and higher in females 11-17 years old than in males 11-17 years old. In addition, an age-dependent decay was observed, that is, antibody decreased more rapidly in younger than in older children. 
Conclusions: Vaccination of children with two doses of Epaxal (R) Junior confers a real-time protection of at least 5.5 years. This protection is estimated to last approximately 25 years. Younger children showed lower antibody titers and a faster antibody decline than older children. Additional follow-up studies are needed beyond 5.5 years to further assess the longterm immunogenicity of Epaxal (R) Junior.},
  author       = {Van Herck, Koen and Hens, Annick and De Coster, Ilse and Vertruyen, Andr{\'e} and Tolboom, Jeroen and Sarnecki, Michal and Van Damme, Pierre},
  issn         = {0891-3668},
  journal      = {PEDIATRIC INFECTIOUS DISEASE JOURNAL},
  keyword      = {pediatric,long-term protection,virosomes,hepatitis A,RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIAL,AGED 1-16 YEARS,FOLLOW-UP,INACTIVATED VIROSOME,VIRUS-VACCINE,EARLY-LIFE,B VACCINE,IMMUNOGENICITY,PROTECTION,IMMUNITY},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {e85--e91},
  title        = {Long-term antibody persistence in children after vaccination with the pediatric formulation of an aluminum-free virosomal hepatitis A vaccine},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/INF.0000000000000616},
  volume       = {34},
  year         = {2015},
}

Chicago
Van Herck, Koen, Annick Hens, Ilse De Coster, André Vertruyen, Jeroen Tolboom, Michal Sarnecki, and Pierre Van Damme. 2015. “Long-term Antibody Persistence in Children After Vaccination with the Pediatric Formulation of an Aluminum-free Virosomal Hepatitis A Vaccine.” Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal 34 (4): e85–e91.
APA
Van Herck, Koen, Hens, A., De Coster, I., Vertruyen, A., Tolboom, J., Sarnecki, M., & Van Damme, P. (2015). Long-term antibody persistence in children after vaccination with the pediatric formulation of an aluminum-free virosomal hepatitis A vaccine. PEDIATRIC INFECTIOUS DISEASE JOURNAL, 34(4), e85–e91.
Vancouver
1.
Van Herck K, Hens A, De Coster I, Vertruyen A, Tolboom J, Sarnecki M, et al. Long-term antibody persistence in children after vaccination with the pediatric formulation of an aluminum-free virosomal hepatitis A vaccine. PEDIATRIC INFECTIOUS DISEASE JOURNAL. 2015;34(4):e85–e91.
MLA
Van Herck, Koen, Annick Hens, Ilse De Coster, et al. “Long-term Antibody Persistence in Children After Vaccination with the Pediatric Formulation of an Aluminum-free Virosomal Hepatitis A Vaccine.” PEDIATRIC INFECTIOUS DISEASE JOURNAL 34.4 (2015): e85–e91. Print.