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Environmental limitation contributes to the differential colonization capacity of two forest herbs

Lander Baeten UGent, Martin Hermy and Kris Verheyen UGent (2009) JOURNAL OF VEGETATION SCIENCE. 20(2). p.209-223
abstract
The recovery of forest plant communities in post-agricultural landscapes is largely determined by dispersal constraints, but can environmental legacies of former land use additionally limit the recolonization of recent forests by forest herbs? Ancient forest and recent forest on former heavily fertilized agricultural land (Muizenbos, northern Belgium). Seeds and adults of two forest herbs with similar life-history traits, but contrasting colonization capacity - the fast-colonizing Geum urbanum and the slow-colonizing Primula elatior - were introduced into both ancient and recent forest sites. Soil conditions and plant tissue nutrient concentrations were measured to characterize habitat quality. To determine whether the introduced species could successfully establish and persist, we monitored recruitment, longevity and adult performance during 8 years in permanently marked plots. Phosphorus availability was ten times higher in recent forest soils and was also reflected in the plant tissue samples. Species longevity was clearly lower in recent forest sites indicating higher turnover. The fast-colonizing G. urbanum counterbalanced this lower longevity by new establishment, while the slow-colonizing P. elatior dropped below the number of originally introduced individuals. Additionally, G. urbanum performed better in recent forest sites in contrast to P. elatior. Even when dispersal constraints of the slow-colonizing forest herb P. elatior are eliminated through introduction, environmental conditions in recent forest sites additionally restrict its recruitment, longevity and performance. These experimental results suggest that environmental constraints may strengthen the differences in colonization capacity among forest herbs if slow dispersers also tend to be less likely to establish.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
Post-agricultural forest, Phosphorus, Herb layer recovery, Introduction experiment, Secondary succession, LAND-USE HISTORY, PLANT-SPECIES COLONIZATION, POSTAGRICULTURAL FORESTS, INTEGRATED ANALYSIS, RELATIVE IMPORTANCE, HABITAT QUALITY, VASCULAR PLANTS, MUIZEN FOREST, NEW-ENGLAND, RECRUITMENT
journal title
JOURNAL OF VEGETATION SCIENCE
J. Veg. Sci.
volume
20
issue
2
pages
209 - 223
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000264568200003
JCR category
FORESTRY
JCR impact factor
2.376 (2009)
JCR rank
2/46 (2009)
JCR quartile
1 (2009)
ISSN
1100-9233
DOI
10.1111/j.1654-1103.2009.05595.x
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
593142
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-593142
date created
2009-04-10 10:31:48
date last changed
2009-05-04 14:31:33
@article{593142,
  abstract     = {The recovery of forest plant communities in post-agricultural landscapes is largely determined by dispersal constraints, but can environmental legacies of former land use additionally limit the recolonization of recent forests by forest herbs?
Ancient forest and recent forest on former heavily fertilized agricultural land (Muizenbos, northern Belgium).
Seeds and adults of two forest herbs with similar life-history traits, but contrasting colonization capacity - the fast-colonizing Geum urbanum and the slow-colonizing Primula elatior - were introduced into both ancient and recent forest sites. Soil conditions and plant tissue nutrient concentrations were measured to characterize habitat quality. To determine whether the introduced species could successfully establish and persist, we monitored recruitment, longevity and adult performance during 8 years in permanently marked plots.
Phosphorus availability was ten times higher in recent forest soils and was also reflected in the plant tissue samples. Species longevity was clearly lower in recent forest sites indicating higher turnover. The fast-colonizing G. urbanum counterbalanced this lower longevity by new establishment, while the slow-colonizing P. elatior dropped below the number of originally introduced individuals. Additionally, G. urbanum performed better in recent forest sites in contrast to P. elatior.
Even when dispersal constraints of the slow-colonizing forest herb P. elatior are eliminated through introduction, environmental conditions in recent forest sites additionally restrict its recruitment, longevity and performance. These experimental results suggest that environmental constraints may strengthen the differences in colonization capacity among forest herbs if slow dispersers also tend to be less likely to establish.},
  author       = {Baeten, Lander and Hermy, Martin and Verheyen, Kris},
  issn         = {1100-9233},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF VEGETATION SCIENCE},
  keyword      = {Post-agricultural forest,Phosphorus,Herb layer recovery,Introduction experiment,Secondary succession,LAND-USE HISTORY,PLANT-SPECIES COLONIZATION,POSTAGRICULTURAL FORESTS,INTEGRATED ANALYSIS,RELATIVE IMPORTANCE,HABITAT QUALITY,VASCULAR PLANTS,MUIZEN FOREST,NEW-ENGLAND,RECRUITMENT},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {209--223},
  title        = {Environmental limitation contributes to the differential colonization capacity of two forest herbs},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1654-1103.2009.05595.x},
  volume       = {20},
  year         = {2009},
}

Chicago
Baeten, Lander, Martin Hermy, and Kris Verheyen. 2009. “Environmental Limitation Contributes to the Differential Colonization Capacity of Two Forest Herbs.” Journal of Vegetation Science 20 (2): 209–223.
APA
Baeten, L., Hermy, M., & Verheyen, K. (2009). Environmental limitation contributes to the differential colonization capacity of two forest herbs. JOURNAL OF VEGETATION SCIENCE, 20(2), 209–223.
Vancouver
1.
Baeten L, Hermy M, Verheyen K. Environmental limitation contributes to the differential colonization capacity of two forest herbs. JOURNAL OF VEGETATION SCIENCE. 2009;20(2):209–23.
MLA
Baeten, Lander, Martin Hermy, and Kris Verheyen. “Environmental Limitation Contributes to the Differential Colonization Capacity of Two Forest Herbs.” JOURNAL OF VEGETATION SCIENCE 20.2 (2009): 209–223. Print.