Ghent University Academic Bibliography

Advanced

Fluorescence imaging-based screen identifies ARF GEF component of early endosomal trafficking

Hirokazu Tanaka UGent, Saeko Kitakura UGent, Riet De Rycke UGent, Ruth De Groodt UGent and Jiri Friml UGent (2009) Current Biology. 19(5). p.391-397
abstract
Endocytic vesicle trafficking is crucial for regulating activity and localization of plasma membrane components, but the process Is still poorly genetically defined In plants. Membrane proteins of the PIN-FORMED (PIN) family exhibit polar localization In plant cells and facilitate cellular efflux of the plant hormone auxin, thereby regulating multiple developmental processes [1, 2]. PIN proteins undergo constitutive endocytosis and GNOM ARF GEF-dependent recycling [3-5], and their localization Is under extensive regulation by developmental and environmental cues [6-9]. We designed a fluorescence Imaging-based screen to Identify Arabidopsis thaliana mutants defective in internalization of proteins including PINs from the plasma membrane. We Identified three mutant loci, BFA-visualized endocytic trafficking defective1 (ben1) through ben3that do not efficiently accumulate PIN1-GFP In Intracellular compartments after Inhibition of recycling and secretion by fungal toxin brefeldin A (BFA). Fine mapping revealed that BEN1 encodes an ARF GEF vesicle trafficking regulator from the functionally uncharacterized BIG class. ben 1 mutant has been previously Implicated in pathogen response [10] and shows cell polarity, BFA sensitivity, and growth defects. BEN1 is Involved in endocytosis of plasma membrane proteins and localizes to early endocytic compartments distinct from GNOM-positive endosomes. Our results Identify BEN1 as the ARF GEF mediating early endosomal traffic.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
journal title
Current Biology
Curr. Biol.
volume
19
issue
5
pages
391 - 397
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000264171100027
JCR category
BIOCHEMISTRY & MOLECULAR BIOLOGY
JCR impact factor
10.992 (2009)
JCR rank
15/281 (2009)
JCR quartile
1 (2009)
ISSN
0960-9822
DOI
10.1016/j.cub.2009.01.057
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I don't know the status of the copyright for this publication
id
593010
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-593010
date created
2009-04-09 17:32:35
date last changed
2009-04-10 14:35:09
@article{593010,
  abstract     = {Endocytic vesicle trafficking is crucial for regulating activity and localization of plasma membrane components, but the process Is still poorly genetically defined In plants. Membrane proteins of the PIN-FORMED (PIN) family exhibit polar localization In plant cells and facilitate cellular efflux of the plant hormone auxin, thereby regulating multiple developmental processes [1, 2]. PIN proteins undergo constitutive endocytosis and GNOM ARF GEF-dependent recycling [3-5], and their localization Is under extensive regulation by developmental and environmental cues [6-9]. We designed a fluorescence Imaging-based screen to Identify Arabidopsis thaliana mutants defective in internalization of proteins including PINs from the plasma membrane. We Identified three mutant loci, BFA-visualized endocytic trafficking defective1 (ben1) through ben3that do not efficiently accumulate PIN1-GFP In Intracellular compartments after Inhibition of recycling and secretion by fungal toxin brefeldin A (BFA). Fine mapping revealed that BEN1 encodes an ARF GEF vesicle trafficking regulator from the functionally uncharacterized BIG class. ben 1 mutant has been previously Implicated in pathogen response [10] and shows cell polarity, BFA sensitivity, and growth defects. BEN1 is Involved in endocytosis of plasma membrane proteins and localizes to early endocytic compartments distinct from GNOM-positive endosomes. Our results Identify BEN1 as the ARF GEF mediating early endosomal traffic.},
  author       = {Tanaka, Hirokazu and Kitakura, Saeko and De Rycke, Riet and De Groodt, Ruth and Friml, Jiri},
  issn         = {0960-9822},
  journal      = {Current Biology},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {391--397},
  title        = {Fluorescence imaging-based screen identifies ARF GEF component of early endosomal trafficking},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2009.01.057},
  volume       = {19},
  year         = {2009},
}

Chicago
Tanaka, Hirokazu, Saeko Kitakura, Riet De Rycke, Ruth De Groodt, and Jiri Friml. 2009. “Fluorescence Imaging-based Screen Identifies ARF GEF Component of Early Endosomal Trafficking.” Current Biology 19 (5): 391–397.
APA
Tanaka, Hirokazu, Kitakura, S., De Rycke, R., De Groodt, R., & Friml, J. (2009). Fluorescence imaging-based screen identifies ARF GEF component of early endosomal trafficking. Current Biology, 19(5), 391–397.
Vancouver
1.
Tanaka H, Kitakura S, De Rycke R, De Groodt R, Friml J. Fluorescence imaging-based screen identifies ARF GEF component of early endosomal trafficking. Current Biology. 2009;19(5):391–7.
MLA
Tanaka, Hirokazu, Saeko Kitakura, Riet De Rycke, et al. “Fluorescence Imaging-based Screen Identifies ARF GEF Component of Early Endosomal Trafficking.” Current Biology 19.5 (2009): 391–397. Print.