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Defining 'The University:' From 'Ivory Tower' to 'Convenience Store'

Tom Claes (UGent)
Author
Organization
Abstract
Recent changes in the organisation and financing of universities affecting both their research and their teaching mission have provoked intense debate on how the university should be organised, echoing Edward Shills’ call for ‘saving its soul.’ Figuring predominantly in these discussions are ‘definitions’ of what a university really is. In this paper some of these discussion on the nature of the university will be analysed from the viewpoint of analytical ethics. Charles S. Stevenson developed a model for analysing moral discourse and discussion that is highly informative when applied to the discussion on the nature of the university. I will argue that in many cases persuasive definitions are central to the discussion. The applicability of other insight from the analysis of moral discussion - e.g. his distinction between agreement/disagreement in belief and attitude - will be explored. From this we can conclude that the battle for the university is a moral discussion, and that ‘the university’ behaves like a moral term.
Keywords
Persuasive Definition, University, Ethics, Higher Education

Citation

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Chicago
Claes, Tom. 2005. “Defining ‘The University:’ From ‘Ivory Tower’ to ‘Convenience Store’.” In Probing the Boundaries of Higher Education, ed. Frank McMahon and Tom Claes, 12:35–49. Oxford: Inter-Disciplinary Press.
APA
Claes, Tom. (2005). Defining “The University:” From “Ivory Tower” to “Convenience Store.” In F. McMahon & T. Claes (Eds.), Probing the Boundaries of Higher Education (Vol. 12, pp. 35–49). Presented at the First Global Conference on The Idea of Education, Oxford: Inter-Disciplinary Press.
Vancouver
1.
Claes T. Defining “The University:” From “Ivory Tower” to “Convenience Store.”In: McMahon F, Claes T, editors. Probing the Boundaries of Higher Education. Oxford: Inter-Disciplinary Press; 2005. p. 35–49.
MLA
Claes, Tom. “Defining ‘The University:’ From ‘Ivory Tower’ to ‘Convenience Store’.” Probing the Boundaries of Higher Education. Ed. Frank McMahon & Tom Claes. Vol. 12. Oxford: Inter-Disciplinary Press, 2005. 35–49. Print.
@inproceedings{592273,
  abstract     = {Recent changes in the organisation and financing of universities affecting both their research and their teaching mission have provoked intense debate on how the university should be organised, echoing Edward Shills{\textquoteright} call for {\textquoteleft}saving its soul.{\textquoteright} Figuring predominantly in these discussions are {\textquoteleft}definitions{\textquoteright} of what a university really is.
In this paper some of these discussion on the nature of the university will be analysed from the viewpoint of analytical ethics. Charles S. Stevenson developed a model for analysing moral discourse and discussion that is highly informative when applied to the discussion on the nature of the university. I will argue that in many cases persuasive definitions are central to the discussion. The applicability of other insight from the analysis of moral discussion - e.g. his distinction between agreement/disagreement in belief and attitude - will be explored. From this we can conclude that the battle for the university is a moral discussion, and that {\textquoteleft}the university{\textquoteright} behaves like a moral term.},
  author       = {Claes, Tom},
  booktitle    = {Probing the Boundaries of Higher Education},
  editor       = {McMahon, Frank and Claes, Tom},
  isbn         = {1-904710-11-5},
  keyword      = {Persuasive Definition,University,Ethics,Higher Education},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Oxford, UNITED KINGDOM},
  pages        = {35--49},
  publisher    = {Inter-Disciplinary Press},
  title        = {Defining 'The University:' From 'Ivory Tower' to 'Convenience Store'},
  volume       = {12},
  year         = {2005},
}