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Influence of balance surface on ankle stabilizing muscle activity in subjects with chronic ankle instability

Roel De Ridder UGent, Tine Willems UGent, Jos Vanrenterghem and Philip Roosen UGent (2015) JOURNAL OF REHABILITATION MEDICINE. 47(7). p.632-638
abstract
Objective: To evaluate the effect of surface type on muscle activity of ankle stabilizing muscles in subjects with chronic ankle instability. Design: Case controlled, repeated measures study design. Subjects: 28 subjects with chronic ankle instability and 28 healthy controls. Methods: Subjects performed a barefooted single legged stance on uni-axial and multidirectional unstable surfaces. Muscle activity of the mm. peroneus longus/brevis, tibialis anterior, gastrocnemius medialis was registered using surface electromyography. Mixed model analysis was used to explore differences in muscle activity between subjects with chronic ankle instability and controls, and the effect of surface type on muscle activity levels within subjects with chronic ankle instability. Results: No differences were found between subjects with chronic ankle instability and healthy controls. Within subjects with chronic ankle instability, balancing along a frontal axis and on the BOSU evoked overall highest muscle activity level and the firm surface the least. Balancing on the firm surface showed the lowest tibialis anterior/peroneus longus ratio, followed by balancing along a frontal axis and on the Airex pad. Conclusions: Clinicians can use these findings to improve the focus of their balance training program by gradually progressing in difficulty level based on muscle activation levels taking cocontraction ratio’s into account.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
REHABILITATION, SPRAINS, ACTIVATION, REACTION-TIME, CONTROLLED-TRIAL, PERONEUS LONGUS, FUNCTIONAL INSTABILITY, BOARD TRAINING-PROGRAM, rehabilitation, postural balance, joint instability, Ankle joint, PROPRIOCEPTION, EXERCISES
journal title
JOURNAL OF REHABILITATION MEDICINE
J. Rehabil. Med.
volume
47
issue
7
pages
632 - 638
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000358822700009
JCR category
REHABILITATION
JCR impact factor
1.595 (2015)
JCR rank
25/65 (2015)
JCR quartile
2 (2015)
ISSN
1650-1977
DOI
10.2340/16501977-1970
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
5916846
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-5916846
date created
2015-03-30 12:01:53
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:48:18
@article{5916846,
  abstract     = {Objective: To evaluate the effect of surface type on muscle activity of ankle stabilizing muscles in subjects with chronic ankle instability.
Design:  Case controlled, repeated measures study design.
Subjects: 28 subjects with chronic ankle instability and 28 healthy controls. 
Methods: Subjects performed a barefooted single legged stance on uni-axial and multidirectional unstable surfaces. Muscle activity of the mm. peroneus longus/brevis, tibialis anterior, gastrocnemius medialis was registered using surface electromyography. Mixed model analysis was used to explore differences in muscle activity between subjects with chronic ankle instability and controls, and the effect of surface type on muscle activity levels within subjects with chronic ankle instability.
Results: No differences were found between subjects with chronic ankle instability and healthy controls. Within subjects with chronic ankle instability, balancing along a frontal axis and on the BOSU evoked overall highest muscle activity level and the firm surface the least. Balancing on the firm surface showed the lowest tibialis anterior/peroneus longus ratio, followed by balancing along a frontal axis and on the Airex pad.
Conclusions: Clinicians can use these findings to improve the focus of their balance training program by gradually progressing in difficulty level based on muscle activation levels taking cocontraction ratio{\textquoteright}s into account.},
  author       = {De Ridder, Roel and Willems, Tine and Vanrenterghem, Jos and Roosen, Philip},
  issn         = {1650-1977},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF REHABILITATION MEDICINE},
  keyword      = {REHABILITATION,SPRAINS,ACTIVATION,REACTION-TIME,CONTROLLED-TRIAL,PERONEUS LONGUS,FUNCTIONAL INSTABILITY,BOARD TRAINING-PROGRAM,rehabilitation,postural balance,joint instability,Ankle joint,PROPRIOCEPTION,EXERCISES},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {632--638},
  title        = {Influence of balance surface on ankle stabilizing muscle activity in subjects with chronic ankle instability},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2340/16501977-1970},
  volume       = {47},
  year         = {2015},
}

Chicago
De Ridder, Roel, Tine Willems, Jos Vanrenterghem, and Philip Roosen. 2015. “Influence of Balance Surface on Ankle Stabilizing Muscle Activity in Subjects with Chronic Ankle Instability.” Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine 47 (7): 632–638.
APA
De Ridder, Roel, Willems, T., Vanrenterghem, J., & Roosen, P. (2015). Influence of balance surface on ankle stabilizing muscle activity in subjects with chronic ankle instability. JOURNAL OF REHABILITATION MEDICINE, 47(7), 632–638.
Vancouver
1.
De Ridder R, Willems T, Vanrenterghem J, Roosen P. Influence of balance surface on ankle stabilizing muscle activity in subjects with chronic ankle instability. JOURNAL OF REHABILITATION MEDICINE. 2015;47(7):632–8.
MLA
De Ridder, Roel, Tine Willems, Jos Vanrenterghem, et al. “Influence of Balance Surface on Ankle Stabilizing Muscle Activity in Subjects with Chronic Ankle Instability.” JOURNAL OF REHABILITATION MEDICINE 47.7 (2015): 632–638. Print.