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Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory effects by plant phenolic compounds

Nadin Al Shukor (UGent) , John Van Camp (UGent) , Gerard Gonzales (UGent) , Dorien Staljanssens (UGent) , Karin Struijs (UGent) , Moises João Zotti, Katleen Raes (UGent) and Guy Smagghe (UGent)
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Abstract
A wide range of phenolic compounds belonging to different classes and subclasses with a potency to inhibit angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) were investigated in vitro. Structure-activity relationship analysis and molecular docking were used to understand the key structural elements influencing ACE inhibitory activity. Tannic acid showed the highest activity with an IC50 value of 0.23 mM. In the class of phenolic acids, both hydroxybenzoic and hydroxycinnamic acids resulted in ACE inhibition with IC50 values ranging from 2 to 9.3 mM. The IC50 values obtained for flavonoids ranged from 0.41 to 1.4 mM with quercetin, kaempferol and rutin being the most active ones. Our structure-activity relashionship analysis showed that the numbers of hydroxyl groups on the benzene ring play an important role for activity of phenolic compounds, and that substitution of hydroxyl groups by methoxy groups decreased activity. Docking studies indicated that phenolic acids and flavonoids inhibit ACE via interaction with the zinc ion in the active site. Other compounds such as resveratrol and pyrogallol may inhibit ACE via interactions with amino acids at the active site and thereby blocking the catalytic activity of ACE. These structure-function relationships are useful to design new ACE inhibitors based on phenolic compounds.

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MLA
Al Shukor, Nadin, et al. “Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitory Effects by Plant Phenolic Compounds.” Applied Biological Sciences, 19th National Symposium, Abstracts, 2014.
APA
Al Shukor, N., Van Camp, J., Gonzales, G., Staljanssens, D., Struijs, K., Zotti, M. J., … Smagghe, G. (2014). Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory effects by plant phenolic compounds. Applied Biological Sciences, 19th National Symposium, Abstracts. Presented at the 19th National symposium on Applied Biological Sciences, Gembloux, Belgium.
Chicago author-date
Al Shukor, Nadin, John Van Camp, Gerard Gonzales, Dorien Staljanssens, Karin Struijs, Moises João Zotti, Katleen Raes, and Guy Smagghe. 2014. “Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitory Effects by Plant Phenolic Compounds.” In Applied Biological Sciences, 19th National Symposium, Abstracts.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Al Shukor, Nadin, John Van Camp, Gerard Gonzales, Dorien Staljanssens, Karin Struijs, Moises João Zotti, Katleen Raes, and Guy Smagghe. 2014. “Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitory Effects by Plant Phenolic Compounds.” In Applied Biological Sciences, 19th National Symposium, Abstracts.
Vancouver
1.
Al Shukor N, Van Camp J, Gonzales G, Staljanssens D, Struijs K, Zotti MJ, et al. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory effects by plant phenolic compounds. In: Applied Biological Sciences, 19th National symposium, Abstracts. 2014.
IEEE
[1]
N. Al Shukor et al., “Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory effects by plant phenolic compounds,” in Applied Biological Sciences, 19th National symposium, Abstracts, Gembloux, Belgium, 2014.
@inproceedings{5894140,
  abstract     = {{A wide range of phenolic compounds belonging to different classes and subclasses with a potency to inhibit angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) were investigated in vitro. Structure-activity relationship analysis and molecular docking were used to understand the key structural elements influencing ACE inhibitory activity.
Tannic acid showed the highest activity with an IC50 value of 0.23 mM. In the class of phenolic acids, both hydroxybenzoic and hydroxycinnamic acids resulted in ACE inhibition with IC50 values ranging from 2 to 9.3 mM. The IC50 values obtained for flavonoids ranged from 0.41 to 1.4 mM with quercetin, kaempferol and rutin being the most active ones. Our structure-activity relashionship analysis showed that the numbers of hydroxyl groups on the benzene ring play an important role for activity of phenolic compounds, and that substitution of hydroxyl groups by methoxy groups decreased activity. Docking studies indicated that phenolic acids and flavonoids inhibit ACE via interaction with the zinc ion in the active site. Other compounds such as resveratrol and pyrogallol may inhibit ACE via interactions with amino acids at the active site and thereby blocking the catalytic activity of ACE. These structure-function relationships are useful to design new ACE inhibitors based on phenolic compounds.}},
  author       = {{Al Shukor, Nadin and Van Camp, John and Gonzales, Gerard and Staljanssens, Dorien and Struijs, Karin and Zotti, Moises João and Raes, Katleen and Smagghe, Guy}},
  booktitle    = {{Applied Biological Sciences, 19th National symposium, Abstracts}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  location     = {{Gembloux, Belgium}},
  title        = {{Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory effects by plant phenolic compounds}},
  year         = {{2014}},
}