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Preserved imitation of known gestures in children with high-functioning autism

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Abstract
It has been suggested that children with autism are particularly deficient at imitating novel gestures or gestures without goals. In the present study, we asked high-functioning autistic children and age-matched typically developing children to imitate several types of gestures that could be either already known or novel to them. Known gestures either conveyed a communicative meaning (i.e., intransitive) or involved the use of objects (i.e., transitive). We observed a significant interaction between gesture type and group of participants, with children with autism performing known gestures better than novel gestures. However, imitation of intransitive and transitive gestures did not differ across groups. These findings are discussed in light of a dual-route model for action imitation.
Keywords
action imitation, autism

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Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Carmo, Joana C et al. “Preserved Imitation of Known Gestures in Children with High-functioning Autism.” ISRN NEUROLOGY (2013): n. pag. Print.
APA
Carmo, J. C., Rumiati, R. I., Siugzdaite, R., & Brambilla, P. (2013). Preserved imitation of known gestures in children with high-functioning autism. ISRN NEUROLOGY.
Chicago author-date
Carmo, Joana C, Raffaella I Rumiati, Roma Siugzdaite, and Paolo Brambilla. 2013. “Preserved Imitation of Known Gestures in Children with High-functioning Autism.” Isrn Neurology.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Carmo, Joana C, Raffaella I Rumiati, Roma Siugzdaite, and Paolo Brambilla. 2013. “Preserved Imitation of Known Gestures in Children with High-functioning Autism.” Isrn Neurology.
Vancouver
1.
Carmo JC, Rumiati RI, Siugzdaite R, Brambilla P. Preserved imitation of known gestures in children with high-functioning autism. ISRN NEUROLOGY. 2013;
IEEE
[1]
J. C. Carmo, R. I. Rumiati, R. Siugzdaite, and P. Brambilla, “Preserved imitation of known gestures in children with high-functioning autism,” ISRN NEUROLOGY, 2013.
@article{5890016,
  abstract     = {It has been suggested that children with autism are particularly deficient at imitating novel gestures or gestures without goals. In the present study, we asked high-functioning autistic children and age-matched typically developing children to imitate several types of gestures that could be either already known or novel to them. Known gestures either conveyed a communicative meaning (i.e., intransitive) or involved the use of objects (i.e., transitive). We observed a significant interaction between gesture type and group of participants, with children with autism performing known gestures better than novel gestures. However, imitation of intransitive and transitive gestures did not differ across groups. These findings are discussed in light of a dual-route model for action imitation.},
  author       = {Carmo, Joana C and Rumiati, Raffaella I and Siugzdaite, Roma and Brambilla, Paolo},
  issn         = {2090-5505},
  journal      = {ISRN NEUROLOGY},
  keywords     = {action imitation,autism},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {8},
  title        = {Preserved imitation of known gestures in children with high-functioning autism},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/751516},
  year         = {2013},
}

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