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A versatile and experimentally validated finite element model to assess the accuracy of shear wave elastography in a bounded viscoelastic medium

Annette Caenen UGent, Darya Shcherbakova UGent, Benedict Verhegghe, Clement Papadacci, Mathieu Pernot, Patrick Segers UGent and Abigaïl Swillens (2015) IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ULTRASONICS FERROELECTRICS AND FREQUENCY CONTROL. 62(3). p.439-450
abstract
The feasibility of shear wave elastography (SWE) in arteries for cardiovascular risk assessment remains to be investigated as the artery's thin wall and intricate material properties induce complex shear wave (SW) propagation phenomena. To better understand the SW physics in bounded media, we proposed an in vitro validated finite element model capable of simulating SW propagation, with full flexibility at the level of the tissue's geometry, material properties, and acoustic radiation force. This computer model was presented in a relatively basic set-up, a homogeneous slab of gelatin-agar material (4.35 mm thick), allowing validation of the numerical settings according to actual SWE measurements. The resulting tissue velocity waveforms and SW propagation speed matched well with the measurement: 4.46 m/s (simulation) versus 4.63 +/- 0.07 m/s (experiment). Further, we identified the impact of geometrical and material parameters on the SW propagation characteristics. As expected, phantom thickness was a determining factor of dispersion. Adding viscoelasticity to the model augmented the estimated wave speed to 4.58 m/s, an even better match with the experimental determined value. This study demonstrated that finite element modeling can be a powerful tool to gain insight into SWE mechanics and will in future work be advanced to more clinically relevant settings.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
ACOUSTIC RADIATION FORCE, LIVER FIBROSIS, ELASTICITY, TISSUES, QUANTIFICATION, SPECTROSCOPY, TECHNOLOGY, EXCITATION, FIELD
journal title
IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ULTRASONICS FERROELECTRICS AND FREQUENCY CONTROL
volume
62
issue
3
pages
439 - 450
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000351446800005
JCR category
ACOUSTICS
JCR impact factor
2.287 (2015)
JCR rank
5/32 (2015)
JCR quartile
1 (2015)
ISSN
0885-3010
DOI
10.1109/TUFFC.2014.006682
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
5889429
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-5889429
date created
2015-03-10 14:59:29
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:39:46
@article{5889429,
  abstract     = {The feasibility of shear wave elastography (SWE) in arteries for cardiovascular risk assessment remains to be investigated as the artery's thin wall and intricate material properties induce complex shear wave (SW) propagation phenomena. To better understand the SW physics in bounded media, we proposed an in vitro validated finite element model capable of simulating SW propagation, with full flexibility at the level of the tissue's geometry, material properties, and acoustic radiation force. This computer model was presented in a relatively basic set-up, a homogeneous slab of gelatin-agar material (4.35 mm thick), allowing validation of the numerical settings according to actual SWE measurements. The resulting tissue velocity waveforms and SW propagation speed matched well with the measurement: 4.46 m/s (simulation) versus 4.63 +/- 0.07 m/s (experiment). Further, we identified the impact of geometrical and material parameters on the SW propagation characteristics. As expected, phantom thickness was a determining factor of dispersion. Adding viscoelasticity to the model augmented the estimated wave speed to 4.58 m/s, an even better match with the experimental determined value. This study demonstrated that finite element modeling can be a powerful tool to gain insight into SWE mechanics and will in future work be advanced to more clinically relevant settings.},
  author       = {Caenen, Annette and Shcherbakova, Darya and Verhegghe, Benedict and Papadacci, Clement and Pernot, Mathieu and Segers, Patrick and Swillens, Abiga{\"i}l},
  issn         = {0885-3010},
  journal      = {IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ULTRASONICS FERROELECTRICS AND FREQUENCY CONTROL},
  keyword      = {ACOUSTIC RADIATION FORCE,LIVER FIBROSIS,ELASTICITY,TISSUES,QUANTIFICATION,SPECTROSCOPY,TECHNOLOGY,EXCITATION,FIELD},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {439--450},
  title        = {A versatile and experimentally validated finite element model to assess the accuracy of shear wave elastography in a bounded viscoelastic medium},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/TUFFC.2014.006682},
  volume       = {62},
  year         = {2015},
}

Chicago
Caenen, Annette, Darya Shcherbakova, Benedict Verhegghe, Clement Papadacci, Mathieu Pernot, Patrick Segers, and Abigaïl Swillens. 2015. “A Versatile and Experimentally Validated Finite Element Model to Assess the Accuracy of Shear Wave Elastography in a Bounded Viscoelastic Medium.” Ieee Transactions on Ultrasonics Ferroelectrics and Frequency Control 62 (3): 439–450.
APA
Caenen, A., Shcherbakova, D., Verhegghe, B., Papadacci, C., Pernot, M., Segers, P., & Swillens, A. (2015). A versatile and experimentally validated finite element model to assess the accuracy of shear wave elastography in a bounded viscoelastic medium. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ULTRASONICS FERROELECTRICS AND FREQUENCY CONTROL, 62(3), 439–450.
Vancouver
1.
Caenen A, Shcherbakova D, Verhegghe B, Papadacci C, Pernot M, Segers P, et al. A versatile and experimentally validated finite element model to assess the accuracy of shear wave elastography in a bounded viscoelastic medium. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ULTRASONICS FERROELECTRICS AND FREQUENCY CONTROL. 2015;62(3):439–50.
MLA
Caenen, Annette, Darya Shcherbakova, Benedict Verhegghe, et al. “A Versatile and Experimentally Validated Finite Element Model to Assess the Accuracy of Shear Wave Elastography in a Bounded Viscoelastic Medium.” IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ULTRASONICS FERROELECTRICS AND FREQUENCY CONTROL 62.3 (2015): 439–450. Print.