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Religious colonialism in early modern Malta : inquisitorial imprisonment and inmate graffiti

Russell Palmer (UGent)
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Abstract
Early modern Malta was governed by three institutions—the Order of St. John, the Bishopric, and the Roman Inquisition—which all ultimately answered to the Holy See. By focusing on the institution under the most direct Papal control, the inquisition, this paper seeks to explore the role of imprisonment in furthering the Vatican’s cultural and political control on the island. Through analyses of the prison cells and the inmate’s graffiti, I argue that the inquisition’s ability to imprison and negate the spectacle of public suffering was crucial to the Vatican’s colonial position in Malta.
Keywords
prisons, graffiti, colonialism, Inquisition, archaeology, Malta

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Citation

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MLA
Palmer, Russell. “Religious Colonialism in Early Modern Malta : Inquisitorial Imprisonment and Inmate Graffiti.” INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF HISTORICAL ARCHAEOLOGY 20.3 (2016): 548–561. Print.
APA
Palmer, R. (2016). Religious colonialism in early modern Malta : inquisitorial imprisonment and inmate graffiti. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF HISTORICAL ARCHAEOLOGY , 20(3), 548–561.
Chicago author-date
Palmer, Russell. 2016. “Religious Colonialism in Early Modern Malta : Inquisitorial Imprisonment and Inmate Graffiti.” International Journal of Historical Archaeology 20 (3): 548–561.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Palmer, Russell. 2016. “Religious Colonialism in Early Modern Malta : Inquisitorial Imprisonment and Inmate Graffiti.” International Journal of Historical Archaeology 20 (3): 548–561.
Vancouver
1.
Palmer R. Religious colonialism in early modern Malta : inquisitorial imprisonment and inmate graffiti. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF HISTORICAL ARCHAEOLOGY . New York: Springer; 2016;20(3):548–61.
IEEE
[1]
R. Palmer, “Religious colonialism in early modern Malta : inquisitorial imprisonment and inmate graffiti,” INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF HISTORICAL ARCHAEOLOGY , vol. 20, no. 3, pp. 548–561, 2016.
@article{5866797,
  abstract     = {Early modern Malta was governed by three institutions—the Order of St. John, the Bishopric, and the Roman Inquisition—which all ultimately answered to the Holy See. By focusing on the institution under the most direct Papal control, the inquisition, this paper seeks to explore the role of imprisonment in furthering the Vatican’s cultural and political control on the island. Through analyses of the prison cells and the inmate’s graffiti, I argue that the inquisition’s ability to imprison and negate the spectacle of public suffering was crucial to the Vatican’s colonial position in Malta.},
  author       = {Palmer, Russell},
  issn         = {1092-7697},
  journal      = {INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF HISTORICAL ARCHAEOLOGY },
  keywords     = {prisons,graffiti,colonialism,Inquisition,archaeology,Malta},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {548--561},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  title        = {Religious colonialism in early modern Malta : inquisitorial imprisonment and inmate graffiti},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10761-016-0359-0},
  volume       = {20},
  year         = {2016},
}

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