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Training models in laparoscopy: are they an adjunct in learning skills and surgical anatomy?

Wouter Willaert (UGent) , Dirk Van de Putte (UGent) , Yves Van Nieuwenhove (UGent) , Wim Ceelen (UGent) and Piet Pattyn (UGent)
Author
Organization
Abstract
Introduction: Surgery has traditionally been learned on patients, which is time-consuming, can have an impact on the patient outcomes, and is of variable effectiveness. As a result, surgical training models have been developed, which are compared in this systematic review. Methods: We searched Pubmed, Central, and Science Citation index expanded for randomised clinical trials comparing laparoscopic training models. Studies comparing one model with no training were also included. Results: A total of 60 studies were identified. Not unexpectedly, 37 out of 40 trials favoured training on a virtual reality (VR) simulator, box-trainer, or live animal versus no training. Besides, two out of three trials showed more training effect when combining surgical models. Both VR simulation and box-trainer equally improved performance in seven trials, while the former was superior in two studies. Learning basic robotic tasks with a VR simulator equalled mechanical robotic training (2). Whether robotics or standard laparoscopy is better to learn these skills remains unclear although one trial recommended 3D view whatever the instrumental aspect (4). Importantly, training basic skills on animal tissue resulted in superior performance compared with box-trainer (1). Similarly, training complex surgical procedures on a fresh human cadaver caused improved dissection, retraction, hand-eye coordination, suturing, bleeding control, and speed of procedure compared with VR simulation (1). Conclusion: Training models are a valuable adjunct in learning basic surgical skills. Combining models improves training effect. Remarkably, although exercising on tissue may improve anatomical knowledge, only one comparative trial has investigated advanced surgical procedures on human cadaveric tissue.

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MLA
WILLAERT, WOUTER, DIRK VAN DE PUTTE, Yves Van Nieuwenhove, et al. “Training Models in Laparoscopy: Are They an Adjunct in Learning Skills and Surgical Anatomy?” Belgian Surgical Week, Abstracts. 2012. Print.
APA
WILLAERT, W., VAN DE PUTTE, D., Van Nieuwenhove, Y., Ceelen, W., & Pattyn, P. (2012). Training models in laparoscopy: are they an adjunct in learning skills and surgical anatomy? Belgian Surgical Week, Abstracts. Presented at the 13th Belgian Surgical Week.
Chicago author-date
WILLAERT, WOUTER, DIRK VAN DE PUTTE, Yves Van Nieuwenhove, Wim Ceelen, and Piet Pattyn. 2012. “Training Models in Laparoscopy: Are They an Adjunct in Learning Skills and Surgical Anatomy?” In Belgian Surgical Week, Abstracts.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
WILLAERT, WOUTER, DIRK VAN DE PUTTE, Yves Van Nieuwenhove, Wim Ceelen, and Piet Pattyn. 2012. “Training Models in Laparoscopy: Are They an Adjunct in Learning Skills and Surgical Anatomy?” In Belgian Surgical Week, Abstracts.
Vancouver
1.
WILLAERT W, VAN DE PUTTE D, Van Nieuwenhove Y, Ceelen W, Pattyn P. Training models in laparoscopy: are they an adjunct in learning skills and surgical anatomy? Belgian Surgical Week, Abstracts. 2012.
IEEE
[1]
W. Willaert, D. Van de Putte, Y. Van Nieuwenhove, W. Ceelen, and P. Pattyn, “Training models in laparoscopy: are they an adjunct in learning skills and surgical anatomy?,” in Belgian Surgical Week, Abstracts, Spa, Belgium, 2012.
@inproceedings{5866048,
  abstract     = {Introduction: Surgery has traditionally been learned on patients, which is time-consuming, can have an impact on the patient outcomes, and is of variable effectiveness. As a result, surgical training models have been developed, which are compared in this systematic review.
Methods: We searched Pubmed, Central, and Science Citation index expanded for randomised clinical trials comparing laparoscopic training models. Studies comparing one model with no training were also included.
Results: A total of 60 studies were identified. Not unexpectedly, 37 out of 40 trials favoured training on a virtual reality (VR) simulator, box-trainer, or live animal versus no training. Besides, two out of three trials showed more training effect when combining surgical models. Both VR simulation and box-trainer equally improved performance in seven trials, while the former was superior in two studies. Learning basic robotic tasks with a VR simulator equalled mechanical robotic training (2). Whether robotics or standard laparoscopy is better to learn these skills remains unclear although one trial recommended 3D view whatever the instrumental aspect (4). Importantly, training basic skills on animal tissue resulted in superior performance compared with box-trainer (1). Similarly, training complex surgical procedures on a fresh human cadaver caused improved dissection, retraction, hand-eye coordination, suturing, bleeding control, and speed of procedure compared with VR simulation (1).
Conclusion: Training models are a valuable adjunct in learning basic surgical skills. Combining models improves training effect. Remarkably, although exercising on tissue may improve anatomical knowledge, only one comparative trial has investigated advanced surgical procedures on human cadaveric tissue.},
  author       = {Willaert, Wouter and Van de Putte, Dirk and Van Nieuwenhove, Yves and Ceelen, Wim and Pattyn, Piet},
  booktitle    = {Belgian Surgical Week, Abstracts},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Spa, Belgium},
  title        = {Training models in laparoscopy: are they an adjunct in learning skills and surgical anatomy?},
  year         = {2012},
}