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De-institutionalization of high culture? Realized curricula in secondary education in Flanders, 1930-2000

Stijn Daenekindt (UGent) and Henk Roose (UGent)
(2015) CULTURAL SOCIOLOGY. 9(4). p.515-533
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Abstract
Based on findings and suggestions originating from educational research, several cultural sociologists have claimed that the educational system has contributed to the erosion of the institutionalized character of fine arts throughout the 20th century. However, empirical research to substantiate this claim is scarce. We focus on secondary education in Flanders to study the centrality of high culture. Our goal is twofold: (1) We want to reflect on the ways the educational system can—via the process of institutionalization—infuse certain cultural products with status. (2) Additionally, we offer an exploratory analysis by studying whether the extent of institutionalization of traditional high culture in the educational system has decreased over the course of the 20th century. Our analyses indicate that—in the period 1930-2000—both high and low cultural forms are increasingly being represented in the school context. However, we find that the increment of high culture is especially situated in the academic track—the most prestigious track, designed to cultivate the future elite. In this way, throughout the 20th century, the educational system continued to channel high culture to the upper social strata of society, thus infusing these forms of culture with status.
Keywords
highbrow culture, UNITED-STATES, educational tracks, aesthetic legitimation, trends, popular culture, curriculum, OMNIVOROUSNESS, LITERARY EDUCATION, SELF-ESTEEM, ART, TRACKING, MUSIC, NETHERLANDS, STRATIFICATION, FILM

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MLA
Daenekindt, Stijn, and Henk Roose. “De-institutionalization of High Culture? Realized Curricula in Secondary Education in Flanders, 1930-2000.” CULTURAL SOCIOLOGY 9.4 (2015): 515–533. Print.
APA
Daenekindt, S., & Roose, H. (2015). De-institutionalization of high culture? Realized curricula in secondary education in Flanders, 1930-2000. CULTURAL SOCIOLOGY, 9(4), 515–533.
Chicago author-date
Daenekindt, Stijn, and Henk Roose. 2015. “De-institutionalization of High Culture? Realized Curricula in Secondary Education in Flanders, 1930-2000.” Cultural Sociology 9 (4): 515–533.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Daenekindt, Stijn, and Henk Roose. 2015. “De-institutionalization of High Culture? Realized Curricula in Secondary Education in Flanders, 1930-2000.” Cultural Sociology 9 (4): 515–533.
Vancouver
1.
Daenekindt S, Roose H. De-institutionalization of high culture? Realized curricula in secondary education in Flanders, 1930-2000. CULTURAL SOCIOLOGY. 2015;9(4):515–33.
IEEE
[1]
S. Daenekindt and H. Roose, “De-institutionalization of high culture? Realized curricula in secondary education in Flanders, 1930-2000,” CULTURAL SOCIOLOGY, vol. 9, no. 4, pp. 515–533, 2015.
@article{5850550,
  abstract     = {Based on findings and suggestions originating from educational research, several cultural sociologists have claimed that the educational system has contributed to the erosion of the institutionalized character of fine arts throughout the 20th century. However, empirical research to substantiate this claim is scarce. We focus on secondary education in Flanders to study the centrality of high culture. Our goal is twofold: (1) We want to reflect on the ways the educational system can—via the process of institutionalization—infuse certain cultural products with status. (2) Additionally, we offer an exploratory analysis by studying whether the extent of institutionalization of traditional high culture in the educational system has decreased over the course of the 20th century. Our analyses indicate that—in the period 1930-2000—both high and low cultural forms are increasingly being represented in the school context. However, we find that the increment of high culture is especially situated in the academic track—the most prestigious track, designed to cultivate the future elite. In this way, throughout the 20th century, the educational system continued to channel high culture to the upper social strata of society, thus infusing these forms of culture with status.},
  author       = {Daenekindt, Stijn and Roose, Henk},
  issn         = {1749-9755},
  journal      = {CULTURAL SOCIOLOGY},
  keywords     = {highbrow culture,UNITED-STATES,educational tracks,aesthetic legitimation,trends,popular culture,curriculum,OMNIVOROUSNESS,LITERARY EDUCATION,SELF-ESTEEM,ART,TRACKING,MUSIC,NETHERLANDS,STRATIFICATION,FILM},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {515--533},
  title        = {De-institutionalization of high culture? Realized curricula in secondary education in Flanders, 1930-2000},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1749975515576942},
  volume       = {9},
  year         = {2015},
}

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