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Urban chronicle writing in late medieval Flanders: the Case of Bruges during the Flemish revolt of 1482-1490

Lisa Demets (UGent) and Jan Dumolyn (UGent)
(2016) URBAN HISTORY. 43(1). p.28-45
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Abstract
The absence of a real' urban chronicle tradition in fifteenth-century Flanders similar to the Italian or German models has raised questions among scholars. However, there is also no satisfactory consensus on the exact meaning or contents of medieval urban historiography'. Some were official' city chronicles, while others lauded patrician lineages or took the viewpoint of specific social groups or corporate organizations and reinforced construction of the groups' collective memories. Some seem to express the literary aspirations of individual city officials or clerics with strong connections to their towns. We propose an analytical framework to identify and measure the urbanity' of late medieval chronicles, taking into account the authorship and thematic emphasis of historiographical texts, but focusing on the social environment of their circulation and the ideological strategies at work.

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Demets, Lisa, and Jan Dumolyn. “Urban Chronicle Writing in Late Medieval Flanders: The Case of Bruges During the Flemish Revolt of 1482-1490.” URBAN HISTORY 43.1 (2016): 28–45. Print.
APA
Demets, L., & Dumolyn, J. (2016). Urban chronicle writing in late medieval Flanders: the Case of Bruges during the Flemish revolt of 1482-1490. URBAN HISTORY, 43(1), 28–45.
Chicago author-date
Demets, Lisa, and Jan Dumolyn. 2016. “Urban Chronicle Writing in Late Medieval Flanders: The Case of Bruges During the Flemish Revolt of 1482-1490.” Urban History 43 (1): 28–45.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Demets, Lisa, and Jan Dumolyn. 2016. “Urban Chronicle Writing in Late Medieval Flanders: The Case of Bruges During the Flemish Revolt of 1482-1490.” Urban History 43 (1): 28–45.
Vancouver
1.
Demets L, Dumolyn J. Urban chronicle writing in late medieval Flanders: the Case of Bruges during the Flemish revolt of 1482-1490. URBAN HISTORY. 2016;43(1):28–45.
IEEE
[1]
L. Demets and J. Dumolyn, “Urban chronicle writing in late medieval Flanders: the Case of Bruges during the Flemish revolt of 1482-1490,” URBAN HISTORY, vol. 43, no. 1, pp. 28–45, 2016.
@article{5839560,
  abstract     = {The absence of a real' urban chronicle tradition in fifteenth-century Flanders similar to the Italian or German models has raised questions among scholars. However, there is also no satisfactory consensus on the exact meaning or contents of medieval urban historiography'. Some were official' city chronicles, while others lauded patrician lineages or took the viewpoint of specific social groups or corporate organizations and reinforced construction of the groups' collective memories. Some seem to express the literary aspirations of individual city officials or clerics with strong connections to their towns. We propose an analytical framework to identify and measure the urbanity' of late medieval chronicles, taking into account the authorship and thematic emphasis of historiographical texts, but focusing on the social environment of their circulation and the ideological strategies at work.},
  author       = {Demets, Lisa and Dumolyn, Jan},
  issn         = {0963-9268},
  journal      = {URBAN HISTORY},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {28--45},
  title        = {Urban chronicle writing in late medieval Flanders: the Case of Bruges during the Flemish revolt of 1482-1490},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0963926815000152},
  volume       = {43},
  year         = {2016},
}

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