Advanced search
1 file | 102.45 KB Add to list

Social threat appeals in commercial advertising: the moderating impact of perceived level of self-efficacy and self-esteem on advertising effectiveness

Author
Organization
Abstract
This study investigates the impact of the level of fear evoked by an advertisement (for deodorant) framing a threatening social situation. Where the effectiveness of threat appeals has been investigated extensively in health communication, this study focuses on the impact of social threat appeals in a commercial setting. The study investigates the moderating impact of self-esteem on the interaction effect between the level of fear (evoked by a social threat ad) and perceived level of self-efficacy on brand attitude and purchase intention. Results show that for high self-esteem individuals, fear evoked by a social threat is effective, only when perceived self-efficacy is increased (in line with the EPPM). However, for low self-esteem individuals, high versus low perceived self-efficacy does not influence brand attitudes and purchase intentions in case of a social threat appeal, but perceived self-efficacy does increase the effectiveness of appeals in which a positive social situation is shown.
Keywords
fear appeals, self-esteem, RESPONSES, SOCIOMETER, advertising effectiveness, self-efficacy, Social threat, METAANALYSIS, FEAR APPEALS

Downloads

  • 03913 Cauberghe formatiert authorcheck DEF.pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • open access
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 102.45 KB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Faseur, Tine, Veroline Cauberghe, and Liselot Hudders. “Social Threat Appeals in Commercial Advertising: The Moderating Impact of Perceived Level of Self-efficacy and Self-esteem on Advertising Effectiveness.” COMMUNICATIONS-EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF COMMUNICATION RESEARCH 40.2 (2015): 171–183. Print.
APA
Faseur, Tine, Cauberghe, V., & Hudders, L. (2015). Social threat appeals in commercial advertising: the moderating impact of perceived level of self-efficacy and self-esteem on advertising effectiveness. COMMUNICATIONS-EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF COMMUNICATION RESEARCH, 40(2), 171–183.
Chicago author-date
Faseur, Tine, Veroline Cauberghe, and Liselot Hudders. 2015. “Social Threat Appeals in Commercial Advertising: The Moderating Impact of Perceived Level of Self-efficacy and Self-esteem on Advertising Effectiveness.” Communications-european Journal of Communication Research 40 (2): 171–183.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Faseur, Tine, Veroline Cauberghe, and Liselot Hudders. 2015. “Social Threat Appeals in Commercial Advertising: The Moderating Impact of Perceived Level of Self-efficacy and Self-esteem on Advertising Effectiveness.” Communications-european Journal of Communication Research 40 (2): 171–183.
Vancouver
1.
Faseur T, Cauberghe V, Hudders L. Social threat appeals in commercial advertising: the moderating impact of perceived level of self-efficacy and self-esteem on advertising effectiveness. COMMUNICATIONS-EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF COMMUNICATION RESEARCH. 2015;40(2):171–83.
IEEE
[1]
T. Faseur, V. Cauberghe, and L. Hudders, “Social threat appeals in commercial advertising: the moderating impact of perceived level of self-efficacy and self-esteem on advertising effectiveness,” COMMUNICATIONS-EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF COMMUNICATION RESEARCH, vol. 40, no. 2, pp. 171–183, 2015.
@article{5838461,
  abstract     = {This study investigates the impact of the level of fear evoked by an advertisement (for deodorant) framing a threatening social situation. Where the effectiveness of threat appeals has been investigated extensively in health communication, this study focuses on the impact of social threat appeals in a commercial setting. The study investigates the moderating impact of self-esteem on the interaction effect between the level of fear (evoked by a social threat ad) and perceived level of self-efficacy on brand attitude and purchase intention. Results show that for high self-esteem individuals, fear evoked by a social threat is effective, only when perceived self-efficacy is increased (in line with the EPPM). However, for low self-esteem individuals, high versus low perceived self-efficacy does not influence brand attitudes and purchase intentions in case of a social threat appeal, but perceived self-efficacy does increase the effectiveness of appeals in which a positive social situation is shown.},
  author       = {Faseur, Tine and Cauberghe, Veroline and Hudders, Liselot},
  issn         = {0341-2059},
  journal      = {COMMUNICATIONS-EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF COMMUNICATION RESEARCH},
  keywords     = {fear appeals,self-esteem,RESPONSES,SOCIOMETER,advertising effectiveness,self-efficacy,Social threat,METAANALYSIS,FEAR APPEALS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {171--183},
  title        = {Social threat appeals in commercial advertising: the moderating impact of perceived level of self-efficacy and self-esteem on advertising effectiveness},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/commun-2015-0002},
  volume       = {40},
  year         = {2015},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric
Web of Science
Times cited: