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The enigma of the rise of angiosperms: can we untie the knot?

L Augusto, TJ Davies, S Delzon and An De Schrijver UGent (2014) ECOLOGY LETTERS. 17(10). p.1326-1338
abstract
Multiple hypotheses have been put forward to explain the rise of angiosperms to ecological dominance following the Cretaceous. A unified scheme incorporating all these theories appears to be an inextricable knot of relationships, processes and plant traits. Here, we revisit these hypotheses, categorising them within frameworks based on plant carbon economy, resistance to climatic stresses, nutrient economy, biotic interactions and diversification. We maintain that the enigma remains unresolved partly because our current state of knowledge is a result of the fragmentary nature of palaeodata. This lack of palaeodata limits our ability to draw firm conclusions. Nonetheless, based on consistent results, some inferences may be drawn. Our results indicate that a complex multidriver hypothesis may be more suitable than any single-driver theory. We contend that plant carbon economy and diversification may have played an important role during the early stages of gymnosperms replacement by angiosperms in fertile tropical sites. Plant tolerance to climatic stresses, plant nutrition, biotic interactions and diversification may have played a role in later stages of angiosperm expansion within temperate and harsh environments. The angiosperm knot remains partly tied, but to unravel it entirely will only be feasible if new discoveries are made by scientific communities.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (review)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
carbon, climate, biotic interaction, DARWINS ABOMINABLE MYSTERY, Angiosperms, diversification, evolutionary radiation, Gymnosperms, nutrient, GROWTH-RATE, LITTER DECOMPOSITION, XYLEM EMBOLISM, EVOLUTIONARY SIGNIFICANCE, TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS, MESOZOIC GYMNOSPERMS, TEMPERATE FORESTS, FUNCTIONAL TRAITS, FLOWERING PLANTS
journal title
ECOLOGY LETTERS
Ecol. Lett.
volume
17
issue
10
pages
1326 - 1338
Web of Science type
Review
Web of Science id
000341883000016
JCR category
ECOLOGY
JCR impact factor
10.689 (2014)
JCR rank
2/145 (2014)
JCR quartile
1 (2014)
ISSN
1461-023X
DOI
10.1111/ele.12323
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
5821531
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-5821531
date created
2015-01-27 10:18:13
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:46:59
@article{5821531,
  abstract     = {Multiple hypotheses have been put forward to explain the rise of angiosperms to ecological dominance following the Cretaceous. A unified scheme incorporating all these theories appears to be an inextricable knot of relationships, processes and plant traits. Here, we revisit these hypotheses, categorising them within frameworks based on plant carbon economy, resistance to climatic stresses, nutrient economy, biotic interactions and diversification. We maintain that the enigma remains unresolved partly because our current state of knowledge is a result of the fragmentary nature of palaeodata. This lack of palaeodata limits our ability to draw firm conclusions. Nonetheless, based on consistent results, some inferences may be drawn. Our results indicate that a complex multidriver hypothesis may be more suitable than any single-driver theory. We contend that plant carbon economy and diversification may have played an important role during the early stages of gymnosperms replacement by angiosperms in fertile tropical sites. Plant tolerance to climatic stresses, plant nutrition, biotic interactions and diversification may have played a role in later stages of angiosperm expansion within temperate and harsh environments. The angiosperm knot remains partly tied, but to unravel it entirely will only be feasible if new discoveries are made by scientific communities.},
  author       = {Augusto, L and Davies, TJ and Delzon, S and De Schrijver, An},
  issn         = {1461-023X},
  journal      = {ECOLOGY LETTERS},
  keyword      = {carbon,climate,biotic interaction,DARWINS ABOMINABLE MYSTERY,Angiosperms,diversification,evolutionary radiation,Gymnosperms,nutrient,GROWTH-RATE,LITTER DECOMPOSITION,XYLEM EMBOLISM,EVOLUTIONARY SIGNIFICANCE,TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS,MESOZOIC GYMNOSPERMS,TEMPERATE FORESTS,FUNCTIONAL TRAITS,FLOWERING PLANTS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {10},
  pages        = {1326--1338},
  title        = {The enigma of the rise of angiosperms: can we untie the knot?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ele.12323},
  volume       = {17},
  year         = {2014},
}

Chicago
Augusto, L, TJ Davies, S Delzon, and An De Schrijver. 2014. “The Enigma of the Rise of Angiosperms: Can We Untie the Knot?” Ecology Letters 17 (10): 1326–1338.
APA
Augusto, L, Davies, T., Delzon, S., & De Schrijver, A. (2014). The enigma of the rise of angiosperms: can we untie the knot? ECOLOGY LETTERS, 17(10), 1326–1338.
Vancouver
1.
Augusto L, Davies T, Delzon S, De Schrijver A. The enigma of the rise of angiosperms: can we untie the knot? ECOLOGY LETTERS. 2014;17(10):1326–38.
MLA
Augusto, L, TJ Davies, S Delzon, et al. “The Enigma of the Rise of Angiosperms: Can We Untie the Knot?” ECOLOGY LETTERS 17.10 (2014): 1326–1338. Print.