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Primary metabolism plays a central role in moulding silicon-inducible brown spot resistance in rice

(2015) MOLECULAR PLANT PATHOLOGY. 16(8). p.811-824
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Abstract
Over the past decades, a multitude of studies have shown the ability of silicon (Si) to protect various plants against a range of microbial pathogens exhibiting different lifestyles and infection strategies. Despite this relative wealth of knowledge, understanding of the action mechanism of Si is still in its infancy, which hinders its widespread application for agricultural purposes. In an attempt to further elucidate the molecular underpinnings of Si-induced disease resistance, we studied the transcriptome of control and Si-treated rice plants infected with the necrotrophic brown spot fungus Cochliobolus miyabeanus. Analysis of brown-spot infected control plants suggested that C. miyabeanus represses plant photosynthetic processes and nitrate reduction in order to trigger premature senescence and cause disease. In Si-treated plants, however, these pathogen-induced metabolic alterations are strongly impaired, suggesting that Si alleviates stress imposed by the pathogen. Interestingly, Si also significantly increased photorespiration rates in brown spot-infected plants. Even though photorespiration is often considered a wasteful process, recent studies indicate that this metabolic bypass also enhances resistance during abiotic stress and pathogen attack by protecting the plant's photosynthetic machinery. In view of these findings, our results favor a scenario whereby Si enhances brown spot resistance by counteracting C. miyabeanus-induced senescence and cell death via increased photorespiration. Moreover, our results shed light onto the mechanistic basis of Si-afforded disease control and support the view that in addition to activating plant immune responses, Si also can reduce disease severity by interfering with pathogen virulence strategies.
Keywords
Bipolaris oryzae, photorespiration, silicon, plant immunity, plant-microbe interactions, photosynthesis, rice, LEAF GAS-EXCHANGE, BIPOLARIS-ORYZAE, COCHLIOBOLUS-MIYABEANUS, NITRATE ASSIMILATION, GLUTAMINE-SYNTHETASE, DISEASE RESISTANCE, OXIDATIVE STRESS, GENE-EXPRESSION, PLANT-DISEASE, WHEAT PLANTS

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Citation

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Chicago
Van Bockhaven, Jonas, Kathy Steppe, Ingvar Bauweraerts, Shoshi Kikuchi, Takayuki Asano, Monica Höfte, and David De Vleesschauwer. 2015. “Primary Metabolism Plays a Central Role in Moulding Silicon-inducible Brown Spot Resistance in Rice.” Molecular Plant Pathology 16 (8): 811–824.
APA
Van Bockhaven, J., Steppe, K., Bauweraerts, I., Kikuchi, S., Asano, T., Höfte, M., & De Vleesschauwer, D. (2015). Primary metabolism plays a central role in moulding silicon-inducible brown spot resistance in rice. MOLECULAR PLANT PATHOLOGY, 16(8), 811–824.
Vancouver
1.
Van Bockhaven J, Steppe K, Bauweraerts I, Kikuchi S, Asano T, Höfte M, et al. Primary metabolism plays a central role in moulding silicon-inducible brown spot resistance in rice. MOLECULAR PLANT PATHOLOGY. 2015;16(8):811–24.
MLA
Van Bockhaven, Jonas, Kathy Steppe, Ingvar Bauweraerts, et al. “Primary Metabolism Plays a Central Role in Moulding Silicon-inducible Brown Spot Resistance in Rice.” MOLECULAR PLANT PATHOLOGY 16.8 (2015): 811–824. Print.
@article{5816275,
  abstract     = {Over the past decades, a multitude of studies have shown the ability of silicon (Si) to protect various plants against a range of microbial pathogens exhibiting different lifestyles and infection strategies. Despite this relative wealth of knowledge, understanding of the action mechanism of Si is still in its infancy, which hinders its widespread application for agricultural purposes. In an attempt to further elucidate the molecular underpinnings of Si-induced disease resistance, we studied the transcriptome of control and Si-treated rice plants infected with the necrotrophic brown spot fungus Cochliobolus miyabeanus. Analysis of brown-spot infected control plants suggested that C. miyabeanus represses plant photosynthetic processes and nitrate reduction in order to trigger premature senescence and cause disease. In Si-treated plants, however, these pathogen-induced metabolic alterations are strongly impaired, suggesting that Si alleviates stress imposed by the pathogen. Interestingly, Si also significantly increased photorespiration rates in brown spot-infected plants. Even though photorespiration is often considered a wasteful process, recent studies indicate that this metabolic bypass also enhances resistance during abiotic stress and pathogen attack by protecting the plant's photosynthetic machinery. In view of these findings, our results favor a scenario whereby Si enhances brown spot resistance by counteracting C. miyabeanus-induced senescence and cell death via increased photorespiration. Moreover, our results shed light onto the mechanistic basis of Si-afforded disease control and support the view that in addition to activating plant immune responses, Si also can reduce disease severity by interfering with pathogen virulence strategies.},
  author       = {Van Bockhaven, Jonas and Steppe, Kathy and Bauweraerts, Ingvar and Kikuchi, Shoshi and Asano, Takayuki and Höfte, Monica and De Vleesschauwer, David},
  issn         = {1464-6722},
  journal      = {MOLECULAR PLANT PATHOLOGY},
  keywords     = {Bipolaris oryzae,photorespiration,silicon,plant immunity,plant-microbe interactions,photosynthesis,rice,LEAF GAS-EXCHANGE,BIPOLARIS-ORYZAE,COCHLIOBOLUS-MIYABEANUS,NITRATE ASSIMILATION,GLUTAMINE-SYNTHETASE,DISEASE RESISTANCE,OXIDATIVE STRESS,GENE-EXPRESSION,PLANT-DISEASE,WHEAT PLANTS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {811--824},
  title        = {Primary metabolism plays a central role in moulding silicon-inducible brown spot resistance in rice},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mpp.12236},
  volume       = {16},
  year         = {2015},
}

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