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Exploration of quorum sensing peptides: the missing link between microbiome and cancer outcome?

(2014)
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Abstract
The human microbiome was recently associated with diverse diseases. The explanation for this relationship is however not yet clarified. In this research, the interaction of quorum sensing peptides, produced by the bacteria, with human cancer cells was explored. First, the chemical characteristics of already known quorum sensing peptides (and analogues), their bacterial origin and quorum sensing related properties were summarized in the Quorumpeps database. The chemical diversity of these quorum sensing peptides was then analyzed, after which diverse model-peptides were selected for further research. After chemical synthesis of these peptides, the purity was investigated, next to the identity of the impurities. A thorough quality control is necessary to correctly interpret functional results. Eventually, the effect of the quorum sensing peptides on human cancer cell behaviour was investigated: we demonstrated that some quorum sensing peptides induced colon and breast cancer cell invasion and promoted angiogenesis; both processes can be linked to cancer metastasis. Some quorum sensing peptides were also found to pass the blood-brain barrier, indicating that these peptides can exert an effect on the brain tissue. Quorum sensing peptides can pass the intestinal barrier as well and thus reach the blood circulation; once they are present in the blood, they can interact with cells throughout the human body. The quorum sensing peptides were also found to remain sufficiently stable in human plasma. Moreover, the quorum sensing peptides demonstrated no haemolytic and no direct cell-killing effects. Finally, we reviewed the quality aspects of radiolabelled peptides as used not only in the biomedical research but also as diagnostics or therapeutics in the current shift towards personalized medicine.
Keywords
Quorum sensing peptides, cancer, microbiome, angiogenesis, invasion

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Chicago
Wynendaele, Evelien. 2014. “Exploration of Quorum Sensing Peptides: The Missing Link Between Microbiome and Cancer Outcome?” Ghent, Belgium: Ghent University. Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences.
APA
Wynendaele, E. (2014). Exploration of quorum sensing peptides: the missing link between microbiome and cancer outcome? Ghent University. Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Ghent, Belgium.
Vancouver
1.
Wynendaele E. Exploration of quorum sensing peptides: the missing link between microbiome and cancer outcome? [Ghent, Belgium]: Ghent University. Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences; 2014.
MLA
Wynendaele, Evelien. “Exploration of Quorum Sensing Peptides: The Missing Link Between Microbiome and Cancer Outcome?” 2014 : n. pag. Print.
@phdthesis{5808447,
  abstract     = {The human microbiome was recently associated with diverse diseases. The explanation for this relationship is however not yet clarified. In this research, the interaction of quorum sensing peptides, produced by the bacteria, with human cancer cells was explored. First, the chemical characteristics of already known quorum sensing peptides (and analogues), their bacterial origin and quorum sensing related properties were summarized in the Quorumpeps database. The chemical diversity of these quorum sensing peptides was then analyzed, after which diverse model-peptides were selected for further research. After chemical synthesis of these peptides, the purity was investigated, next to the identity of the impurities. A thorough quality control is necessary to correctly interpret functional results. Eventually, the effect of the quorum sensing peptides on human cancer cell behaviour was investigated: we demonstrated that some quorum sensing peptides induced colon and breast cancer cell invasion and promoted angiogenesis; both processes can be linked to cancer metastasis. Some quorum sensing peptides were also found to pass the blood-brain barrier, indicating that these peptides can exert an effect on the brain tissue. Quorum sensing peptides can pass the intestinal barrier as well and thus reach the blood circulation; once they are present in the blood, they can interact with cells throughout the human body. The quorum sensing peptides were also found to remain sufficiently stable in human plasma. Moreover, the quorum sensing peptides demonstrated no haemolytic and no direct cell-killing effects. Finally, we reviewed the quality aspects of radiolabelled peptides as used not only in the biomedical research but also as diagnostics or therapeutics in the current shift towards personalized medicine.},
  author       = {Wynendaele, Evelien},
  isbn         = {9789461972514},
  keyword      = {Quorum sensing peptides,cancer,microbiome,angiogenesis,invasion},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {245},
  publisher    = {Ghent University. Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences},
  school       = {Ghent University},
  title        = {Exploration of quorum sensing peptides: the missing link between microbiome and cancer outcome?},
  year         = {2014},
}