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Rheological characterization of gel-in-oil-in-gel type structured emulsions

Ashok Patel (UGent) , Pinar Dumlu, Lien Vermeir (UGent) , Benny Lewille (UGent) , Ans Lesaffer and Koen Dewettinck (UGent)
(2015) FOOD HYDROCOLLOIDS. 46. p.84-92
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Abstract
We report the fabrication of multiple emulsions where both the enclosed and the external water phases are structured using a combination of two non-gelling biopolymers. Emulsions (with gelled inner water droplets and gelled water continuous phase) were created using a simple 'one-step' process where the oil phase (triglyceride oil and polyglycerol polyricinoleate) and the water phase (containing a combination of locust bean gum and carrageenan) were emulsified at an elevated temperature (70 degrees C) followed by cooling to room temperature. The temperature triggered gelling of the synergistic biopolymer combination led to the formation of structured emulsions on cooling. Flowable to self-standing emulsion gels could be prepared by changing the total concentration of polymers (and the ratios of the individual polymers) as confirmed from low amplitude oscillatory shear rheology and creep recovery measurements. The cryo-scanning electron microscopy images of freeze-fractured emulsion samples revealed the presence of gelled inner water droplets. Further, when subjected to heating and cooling cycles, emulsions displayed reversible rheological changes which could be tuned by simply changing the total polymer concentration and the proportions of individual polymers. Such biopolymer-based structured emulsions with interesting microstructure and rheological properties could find potential applications in bio-related fields like food structuring.
Keywords
STABILITY, Rheology, EMULSIFICATION, SINGLE, RELEASE, Locust bean gum, Biopolymeric stabilizers, Carrageenan, INTERNAL PHASE, WATER, COMPLEX EMULSIONS, W/O/W MULTIPLE EMULSIONS, DROPLET SIZE DISTRIBUTION, ONE-STEP FORMATION, Emulsion gels, Structured emulsion

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Chicago
Patel, Ashok, Pinar Dumlu, Lien Vermeir, Benny Lewille, Ans Lesaffer, and Koen Dewettinck. 2015. “Rheological Characterization of Gel-in-oil-in-gel Type Structured Emulsions.” Food Hydrocolloids 46: 84–92.
APA
Patel, A., Dumlu, P., Vermeir, L., Lewille, B., Lesaffer, A., & Dewettinck, K. (2015). Rheological characterization of gel-in-oil-in-gel type structured emulsions. FOOD HYDROCOLLOIDS, 46, 84–92.
Vancouver
1.
Patel A, Dumlu P, Vermeir L, Lewille B, Lesaffer A, Dewettinck K. Rheological characterization of gel-in-oil-in-gel type structured emulsions. FOOD HYDROCOLLOIDS. 2015;46:84–92.
MLA
Patel, Ashok, Pinar Dumlu, Lien Vermeir, et al. “Rheological Characterization of Gel-in-oil-in-gel Type Structured Emulsions.” FOOD HYDROCOLLOIDS 46 (2015): 84–92. Print.
@article{5804620,
  abstract     = {We report the fabrication of multiple emulsions where both the enclosed and the external water phases are structured using a combination of two non-gelling biopolymers. Emulsions (with gelled inner water droplets and gelled water continuous phase) were created using a simple 'one-step' process where the oil phase (triglyceride oil and polyglycerol polyricinoleate) and the water phase (containing a combination of locust bean gum and carrageenan) were emulsified at an elevated temperature (70 degrees C) followed by cooling to room temperature. The temperature triggered gelling of the synergistic biopolymer combination led to the formation of structured emulsions on cooling. Flowable to self-standing emulsion gels could be prepared by changing the total concentration of polymers (and the ratios of the individual polymers) as confirmed from low amplitude oscillatory shear rheology and creep recovery measurements. The cryo-scanning electron microscopy images of freeze-fractured emulsion samples revealed the presence of gelled inner water droplets. Further, when subjected to heating and cooling cycles, emulsions displayed reversible rheological changes which could be tuned by simply changing the total polymer concentration and the proportions of individual polymers. Such biopolymer-based structured emulsions with interesting microstructure and rheological properties could find potential applications in bio-related fields like food structuring.},
  author       = {Patel, Ashok and Dumlu, Pinar and Vermeir, Lien and Lewille, Benny and Lesaffer, Ans and Dewettinck, Koen},
  issn         = {0268-005X},
  journal      = {FOOD HYDROCOLLOIDS},
  keywords     = {STABILITY,Rheology,EMULSIFICATION,SINGLE,RELEASE,Locust bean gum,Biopolymeric stabilizers,Carrageenan,INTERNAL PHASE,WATER,COMPLEX EMULSIONS,W/O/W MULTIPLE EMULSIONS,DROPLET SIZE DISTRIBUTION,ONE-STEP FORMATION,Emulsion gels,Structured emulsion},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {84--92},
  title        = {Rheological characterization of gel-in-oil-in-gel type structured emulsions},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodhyd.2014.12.029},
  volume       = {46},
  year         = {2015},
}

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