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Longitudinal study on the temporal and micro-spatial distribution of Galba truncatula in four farms in Belgium as a base for small-scale risk mapping of Fasciola hepatica

Johannes Charlier UGent, Karen Soenen, Els De Roeck, Wouter Hantson, Els Ducheyne, Frieke Vancoillie UGent, Robert De Wulf UGent, Guy Hendrickx and Jozef Vercruysse UGent (2014) PARASITES & VECTORS. 7.
abstract
Background: The trematode parasite Fasciola hepatica causes important economic losses in ruminants worldwide. Current spatial distribution models do not provide sufficient detail to support farm-specific control strategies. A technology to reliably assess the spatial distribution of intermediate host snail habitats on farms would be a major step forward to this respect. The aim of this study was to conduct a longitudinal field survey in Flanders (Belgium) to (i) characterise suitable small water bodies (SWB) for Galba truncatula and (ii) describe the population dynamics of G. truncatula. Methods: Four F. hepatica-infected farms from two distinct agricultural regions were examined for the abundance of G. truncatula from the beginning (April 2012) until the end (November 2012) of the grazing season. Per farm, 12 to 18 SWB were selected for monthly examination, using a 10 m transect analysis. Observations on G. truncatula abundance were coupled with meteorological and (micro-) environmental factors and the within-herd prevalence of F. hepatica using simple comparison or negative binomial regression models. Results: A total of 54 examined SWB were classified as a pond, ditch, trench, furrow or moist area. G. truncatula abundance was significantly associated with SWB-type, region and total monthly precipitation, but not with monthly temperature. The clear differences in G. truncatula abundance between the 2 studied regions did not result in comparable differences in F. hepatica prevalence in the cattle. Exploration of the relationship of G. truncatula abundance with (micro)-environmental variables revealed a positive association with soil and water pH and the occurrence of Ranunculus sp. and a negative association with mowed pastures, water temperature and presence of reed-like plant species. Conclusions: Farm-level predictions of G. truncatula risk and subsequent risk for F. hepatica occurrence would require a rainfall, soil type (representing the agricultural region) and SWB layer in a geographic information system. While rainfall and soil type information is easily accessible, the recent advances in very high spatial resolution cameras carried on board of satellites, planes or drones should allow the delineation of SWBs in the future.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
Fasciola hepatica, Galba truncatula, Liver fluke, Species distribution, Small-scale, Risk mapping, LYMNAEA-TRUNCATULA, INTERMEDIATE HOSTS, CATTLE, TRANSMISSION, RESOLUTION, INFECTION, SWITZERLAND, INDICATORS, DIAGNOSIS, BALTHICA
journal title
PARASITES & VECTORS
Parasites Vectors
volume
7
article number
528
pages
8 pages
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000345896400001
JCR category
PARASITOLOGY
JCR impact factor
3.43 (2014)
JCR rank
7/36 (2014)
JCR quartile
1 (2014)
ISSN
1756-3305
DOI
10.1186/s13071-014-0528-0
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Public License (CC-BY 4.0)
id
5803191
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-5803191
date created
2015-01-12 15:54:53
date last changed
2017-04-05 09:20:56
@article{5803191,
  abstract     = {Background: The trematode parasite Fasciola hepatica causes important economic losses in ruminants worldwide. Current spatial distribution models do not provide sufficient detail to support farm-specific control strategies. A technology to reliably assess the spatial distribution of intermediate host snail habitats on farms would be a major step forward to this respect. The aim of this study was to conduct a longitudinal field survey in Flanders (Belgium) to (i) characterise suitable small water bodies (SWB) for Galba truncatula and (ii) describe the population dynamics of G. truncatula. 
Methods: Four F. hepatica-infected farms from two distinct agricultural regions were examined for the abundance of G. truncatula from the beginning (April 2012) until the end (November 2012) of the grazing season. Per farm, 12 to 18 SWB were selected for monthly examination, using a 10 m transect analysis. Observations on G. truncatula abundance were coupled with meteorological and (micro-) environmental factors and the within-herd prevalence of F. hepatica using simple comparison or negative binomial regression models. 
Results: A total of 54 examined SWB were classified as a pond, ditch, trench, furrow or moist area. G. truncatula abundance was significantly associated with SWB-type, region and total monthly precipitation, but not with monthly temperature. The clear differences in G. truncatula abundance between the 2 studied regions did not result in comparable differences in F. hepatica prevalence in the cattle. Exploration of the relationship of G. truncatula abundance with (micro)-environmental variables revealed a positive association with soil and water pH and the occurrence of Ranunculus sp. and a negative association with mowed pastures, water temperature and presence of reed-like plant species. 
Conclusions: Farm-level predictions of G. truncatula risk and subsequent risk for F. hepatica occurrence would require a rainfall, soil type (representing the agricultural region) and SWB layer in a geographic information system. While rainfall and soil type information is easily accessible, the recent advances in very high spatial resolution cameras carried on board of satellites, planes or drones should allow the delineation of SWBs in the future.},
  articleno    = {528},
  author       = {Charlier, Johannes and Soenen, Karen and De Roeck, Els and Hantson, Wouter and Ducheyne, Els and Vancoillie, Frieke and De Wulf, Robert and Hendrickx, Guy and Vercruysse, Jozef},
  issn         = {1756-3305},
  journal      = {PARASITES \& VECTORS},
  keyword      = {Fasciola hepatica,Galba truncatula,Liver fluke,Species distribution,Small-scale,Risk mapping,LYMNAEA-TRUNCATULA,INTERMEDIATE HOSTS,CATTLE,TRANSMISSION,RESOLUTION,INFECTION,SWITZERLAND,INDICATORS,DIAGNOSIS,BALTHICA},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {8},
  title        = {Longitudinal study on the temporal and micro-spatial distribution of Galba truncatula in four farms in Belgium as a base for small-scale risk mapping of Fasciola hepatica},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13071-014-0528-0},
  volume       = {7},
  year         = {2014},
}

Chicago
Charlier, Johannes, Karen Soenen, Els De Roeck, Wouter Hantson, Els Ducheyne, Frieke Vancoillie, Robert De Wulf, Guy Hendrickx, and Jozef Vercruysse. 2014. “Longitudinal Study on the Temporal and Micro-spatial Distribution of Galba Truncatula in Four Farms in Belgium as a Base for Small-scale Risk Mapping of Fasciola Hepatica.” Parasites & Vectors 7.
APA
Charlier, Johannes, Soenen, K., De Roeck, E., Hantson, W., Ducheyne, E., Vancoillie, F., De Wulf, R., et al. (2014). Longitudinal study on the temporal and micro-spatial distribution of Galba truncatula in four farms in Belgium as a base for small-scale risk mapping of Fasciola hepatica. PARASITES & VECTORS, 7.
Vancouver
1.
Charlier J, Soenen K, De Roeck E, Hantson W, Ducheyne E, Vancoillie F, et al. Longitudinal study on the temporal and micro-spatial distribution of Galba truncatula in four farms in Belgium as a base for small-scale risk mapping of Fasciola hepatica. PARASITES & VECTORS. 2014;7.
MLA
Charlier, Johannes, Karen Soenen, Els De Roeck, et al. “Longitudinal Study on the Temporal and Micro-spatial Distribution of Galba Truncatula in Four Farms in Belgium as a Base for Small-scale Risk Mapping of Fasciola Hepatica.” PARASITES & VECTORS 7 (2014): n. pag. Print.