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Can changes in psychosocial factors and residency explain the decrease in physical activity during the transition from high school to college or university?

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Abstract
BACKGROUND: When students make the transition from high school to college or university, their physical activity (PA) levels decrease strongly. Consequently, it is of crucial importance to identify the determinants of this decline in PA. PURPOSE: The study aims were to (1) examine changes in psychosocial factors in students during the transition from high school to college/university, (2) examine if changes in psychosocial factors and residency can predict changes in PA, and (3) investigate the moderating effects of residency on the relationship between changes in psychosocial factors and changes in PA. METHOD: Between March 2008 and October 2010, 291 Flemish students participated in a longitudinal study, with baseline measurements during the final year of high school and follow-up measurements at the start of second year of college/university. At both time points, participants completed a questionnaire assessing demographics, active transportation, leisure-time sports, psychosocial variables, and residency. Repeated measures MANOVA analyses and multiple moderated hierarchic regression analyses were conducted. RESULTS: Modeling, self-efficacy, competition-related benefits, and health-related, external and social barriers decreased, while health-related benefits and time-related barriers increased from baseline to follow-up. Decreases in modeling and time-related barriers were associated with a decrease in active transportation (adjusted R 2 = 3.2 %); residency, decreases in self-efficacy, competition-related benefits, and increases in health- and time-related barriers predicted a decrease in leisure-time sports (adjusted R 2 = 29.3 %). Residency only moderated two associations between psychosocial factors and changes in PA. CONCLUSION: Residency and changes in psychosocial factors were mainly important to explain the decrease in leisure-time sports. Other factors such as distance to college/university are likely more important to explain the decrease in active transportation; these are worth exploring in future studies. Because few interactions were found, similar interventions, focusing on self-efficacy, time management, and increasing perceived benefits may be effective to increase leisure-time sports in all students.
Keywords
Determinants, Physical environment, Exercise, Students, Belgium, OLDER ADOLESCENTS, SELF-EFFICACY, LIFE-STYLE, STUDENTS, WEIGHT, ADULTHOOD, BEHAVIORS, HEALTH, YOUTH, DETERMINANTS

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Chicago
Van Dyck, Delfien, Ilse De Bourdeaudhuij, Tom Deliens, and Benedicte Deforche. 2015. “Can Changes in Psychosocial Factors and Residency Explain the Decrease in Physical Activity During the Transition from High School to College or University?” International Journal of Behavioral Medicine 22 (2): 178–186.
APA
Van Dyck, Delfien, De Bourdeaudhuij, I., Deliens, T., & Deforche, B. (2015). Can changes in psychosocial factors and residency explain the decrease in physical activity during the transition from high school to college or university? INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE, 22(2), 178–186.
Vancouver
1.
Van Dyck D, De Bourdeaudhuij I, Deliens T, Deforche B. Can changes in psychosocial factors and residency explain the decrease in physical activity during the transition from high school to college or university? INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE. 2015;22(2):178–86.
MLA
Van Dyck, Delfien, Ilse De Bourdeaudhuij, Tom Deliens, et al. “Can Changes in Psychosocial Factors and Residency Explain the Decrease in Physical Activity During the Transition from High School to College or University?” INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE 22.2 (2015): 178–186. Print.
@article{5800091,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND: When students make the transition from high school to college or university, their physical activity (PA) levels decrease strongly. Consequently, it is of crucial importance to identify the determinants of this decline in PA.
PURPOSE: The study aims were to (1) examine changes in psychosocial factors in students during the transition from high school to college/university, (2) examine if changes in psychosocial factors and residency can predict changes in PA, and (3) investigate the moderating effects of residency on the relationship between changes in psychosocial factors and changes in PA.
METHOD: Between March 2008 and October 2010, 291 Flemish students participated in a longitudinal study, with baseline measurements during the final year of high school and follow-up measurements at the start of second year of college/university. At both time points, participants completed a questionnaire assessing demographics, active transportation, leisure-time sports, psychosocial variables, and residency. Repeated measures MANOVA analyses and multiple moderated hierarchic regression analyses were conducted.
RESULTS: Modeling, self-efficacy, competition-related benefits, and health-related, external and social barriers decreased, while health-related benefits and time-related barriers increased from baseline to follow-up. Decreases in modeling and time-related barriers were associated with a decrease in active transportation (adjusted R 2\,=\,3.2 \%); residency, decreases in self-efficacy, competition-related benefits, and increases in health- and time-related barriers predicted a decrease in leisure-time sports (adjusted R 2\,=\,29.3 \%). Residency only moderated two associations between psychosocial factors and changes in PA.
CONCLUSION: Residency and changes in psychosocial factors were mainly important to explain the decrease in leisure-time sports. Other factors such as distance to college/university are likely more important to explain the decrease in active transportation; these are worth exploring in future studies. Because few interactions were found, similar interventions, focusing on self-efficacy, time management, and increasing perceived benefits may be effective to increase leisure-time sports in all students.},
  author       = {Van Dyck, Delfien and De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse and Deliens, Tom and Deforche, Benedicte},
  issn         = {1070-5503},
  journal      = {INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE},
  keyword      = {Determinants,Physical environment,Exercise,Students,Belgium,OLDER ADOLESCENTS,SELF-EFFICACY,LIFE-STYLE,STUDENTS,WEIGHT,ADULTHOOD,BEHAVIORS,HEALTH,YOUTH,DETERMINANTS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {178--186},
  title        = {Can changes in psychosocial factors and residency explain the decrease in physical activity during the transition from high school to college or university?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12529-014-9424-4},
  volume       = {22},
  year         = {2015},
}

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