Advanced search

Emotion is in the eye of the beholder? Investigating viewing patterns in psychopathy using eye-tracking techniques

Author
Organization
Abstract
Previous research has shown that people with psychopathic traits exhibit diminished emotional responsiveness when confronted with negative stimuli. However, following the response modulation hypothesis psychopathic individuals are capable of adequate emotional responsiveness when the affective information is their primary attentional focus. This study aims to explore this latter hypothesis by examining the scan paths of individuals with psychopathic traits. More specifically, we will explore whether students with higher psychopathy scores have different scan paths when detecting facial emotion expressions compared to students with lower scores on that psychopathy scale. Twenty first-year students will be selected on psychopathic traits based on an initial screening using the Self-Report Psychopathy Scale III. Ten higher and ten lower scoring individuals will complete the UNSW Facial Emotion Task. They are instructed to recognize the emotions of sets of facial expressions on a computer monitor. During this task their scan paths will be registered by means of eye-tracking The primary outcome measures are the order in which different facial cues are inspected and the time devoted to these cues. Secondary outcome measures include response time and response accuracy in the emotion recognition task. If the response modulation hypothesis is correct, then students with similar allocations of attention to facial cues (as measured in the scan paths) should exhibit similar responses in the emotion recognition task. Differences between psychopathy groups on the latter task should be correlated with differences in scan paths. If this is confirmed, the next step will be to measure emotion recognition while selectively manipulating allocation of attention to facial cues. The latter will be accomplished by using a moving window-moving mask paradigm to force/prevent the processing of specific cues by different psychopathy groups.
Keywords
emotion, eye-tracking, Psychopathy

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Stroobants, Lara, Peter De Graef, Katarzyna Uzieblo, and Tom Van Daele. 2014. “Emotion Is in the Eye of the Beholder? Investigating Viewing Patterns in Psychopathy Using Eye-tracking Techniques.” In The Treatment of Psychopathy : Making the Impossible Possible? Abstracts, 14–14. Antwerp, Belgium: Thomas More.
APA
Stroobants, L., De Graef, P., Uzieblo, K., & Van Daele, T. (2014). Emotion is in the eye of the beholder? Investigating viewing patterns in psychopathy using eye-tracking techniques. The treatment of psychopathy : Making the impossible possible? Abstracts (pp. 14–14). Presented at the The treatment of psychopathy : Making the impossible possible?, Antwerp, Belgium: Thomas More.
Vancouver
1.
Stroobants L, De Graef P, Uzieblo K, Van Daele T. Emotion is in the eye of the beholder? Investigating viewing patterns in psychopathy using eye-tracking techniques. The treatment of psychopathy : Making the impossible possible? Abstracts. Antwerp, Belgium: Thomas More; 2014. p. 14–14.
MLA
Stroobants, Lara, Peter De Graef, Katarzyna Uzieblo, et al. “Emotion Is in the Eye of the Beholder? Investigating Viewing Patterns in Psychopathy Using Eye-tracking Techniques.” The Treatment of Psychopathy : Making the Impossible Possible? Abstracts. Antwerp, Belgium: Thomas More, 2014. 14–14. Print.
@inproceedings{5798290,
  abstract     = {Previous research has shown that people with psychopathic traits exhibit diminished emotional responsiveness when confronted with negative stimuli. However, following the response modulation hypothesis psychopathic individuals are capable of adequate emotional responsiveness when the affective information is their primary attentional focus. This study aims to explore this latter hypothesis by examining the scan paths of individuals with psychopathic traits. More specifically, we will explore whether students with higher psychopathy scores have different scan paths when detecting facial emotion expressions compared to students with lower scores on that psychopathy scale. Twenty first-year students will be selected on psychopathic traits based on an initial screening using the Self-Report Psychopathy Scale III. Ten higher and ten lower scoring individuals will complete the UNSW Facial Emotion Task. They are instructed to recognize the emotions of sets of facial expressions on a computer monitor. During this task their scan paths will be registered by means of eye-tracking The primary outcome measures are the order in which different facial cues are inspected and the time devoted to these cues. Secondary outcome measures include response time and response accuracy in the emotion recognition task. If the response modulation hypothesis is correct, then students with similar allocations of attention to facial cues (as measured in the scan paths) should exhibit similar responses in the emotion recognition task. Differences between psychopathy groups on the latter task should be correlated with differences in scan paths. If this is confirmed, the next step will be to measure emotion recognition while selectively manipulating allocation of attention to facial cues. The latter will be accomplished by using a moving window-moving mask paradigm to force/prevent the processing of specific cues by different psychopathy groups.},
  author       = {Stroobants, Lara and De Graef, Peter and Uzieblo, Katarzyna and Van Daele, Tom },
  booktitle    = {The treatment of psychopathy : Making the impossible possible? Abstracts},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Antwerp, Belgium},
  pages        = {14--14},
  publisher    = {Thomas More},
  title        = {Emotion is in the eye of the beholder? Investigating viewing patterns in psychopathy using eye-tracking techniques},
  year         = {2014},
}