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Abstract
Many ions and elements have to be present in a certain concentration range to be suitable for the brewing process and / or the subsequent beer. No restriction in concentration holds for silicon (Si) in beer. Despite the fact that Si is not well studied in human metabolism, more and more agreement exists that it is an essential element for bone mineral density, potentially reducing the chance to develop osteoporosis and bone fractures. Si also reduces the biological availability of aluminium. Many food products have higher concentrations of Si per weight unit (e.g. cereals and soups) than beer but beer has the highest bioavailability. Belgium represents an excellent case study to investigate the variation of Si concentrations among a wide range of beer styles, fermentation processes and used ingredients. 120 Belgian beers were analysed for dissolved Si and the results were compared with typical beer parameters (alcohol content, real extract, original extract, fermentation degree, colour, pH and bitterness). Process conditions were also taking into account. The study confirmed that all beers contain significant dissolved Si (6 - 58 mg L − 1). Most Si is available in strong ales like abbey and trappist ales. Si in the beer originates from the husks of the barley malt. During the brewing process most of the deposited amorphous Si remains in the husks, but significant Si is extracted into the wort during mashing and much of this endures into the beer.
Keywords
dissolved silicon, beer, brewing

Citation

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MLA
Decloedt, Anneleen, Jonas Schoelynck, Eric Struyf, et al. “Dissolved Silicon Content in Belgian Beers.” Malting, Brewing and Distilling, 4th International Young Scientists Symposium, Symposium Book. Ed. Guido Aerts. 2014. 83–83. Print.
APA
Decloedt, Anneleen, Schoelynck, J., Struyf, E., & Van Landschoot, A. (2014). Dissolved silicon content in Belgian beers. In G. Aerts (Ed.), Malting, Brewing and Distilling, 4th International Young Scientists symposium, Symposium book (pp. 83–83). Presented at the 4th International Young Scientists symposium on Malting, Brewing and Distilling.
Chicago author-date
Decloedt, Anneleen, Jonas Schoelynck, Eric Struyf, and Anita Van Landschoot. 2014. “Dissolved Silicon Content in Belgian Beers.” In Malting, Brewing and Distilling, 4th International Young Scientists Symposium, Symposium Book, ed. Guido Aerts, 83–83.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Decloedt, Anneleen, Jonas Schoelynck, Eric Struyf, and Anita Van Landschoot. 2014. “Dissolved Silicon Content in Belgian Beers.” In Malting, Brewing and Distilling, 4th International Young Scientists Symposium, Symposium Book, ed. Guido Aerts, 83–83.
Vancouver
1.
Decloedt A, Schoelynck J, Struyf E, Van Landschoot A. Dissolved silicon content in Belgian beers. In: Aerts G, editor. Malting, Brewing and Distilling, 4th International Young Scientists symposium, Symposium book. 2014. p. 83–83.
IEEE
[1]
A. Decloedt, J. Schoelynck, E. Struyf, and A. Van Landschoot, “Dissolved silicon content in Belgian beers,” in Malting, Brewing and Distilling, 4th International Young Scientists symposium, Symposium book, Gent, Belgium, 2014, pp. 83–83.
@inproceedings{5790840,
  abstract     = {Many ions and elements have to be present in a certain concentration range to be suitable for the brewing process and / or the subsequent beer. No restriction in concentration holds for silicon (Si) in beer. Despite the fact that Si is not well studied in human metabolism, more and more agreement exists that it is an essential element for bone mineral density, potentially reducing the chance to develop osteoporosis and bone fractures. Si also reduces the biological availability of aluminium. Many food products have higher concentrations of Si per weight unit (e.g. cereals and soups) than beer but beer has the highest bioavailability.
Belgium represents an excellent case study to investigate the variation of Si concentrations among a wide range of beer styles, fermentation processes and used ingredients. 120 Belgian beers were analysed for dissolved Si and the results were compared with typical beer parameters (alcohol content, real extract, original extract, fermentation degree, colour, pH and bitterness). Process conditions were also taking into account. The study confirmed that all beers contain significant dissolved Si (6 - 58 mg L − 1). Most Si is available in strong ales like abbey and trappist ales. Si in the beer originates from the husks of the barley malt. During the brewing process most of the deposited amorphous Si remains in the husks, but significant Si is extracted into the wort during mashing and much of this endures into the beer.},
  articleno    = {abstract P6.2},
  author       = {Decloedt, Anneleen and Schoelynck, Jonas and Struyf, Eric and Van Landschoot, Anita},
  booktitle    = {Malting, Brewing and Distilling, 4th International Young Scientists symposium, Symposium book},
  editor       = {Aerts, Guido},
  keywords     = {dissolved silicon,beer,brewing},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Gent, Belgium},
  pages        = {abstract P6.2:83--abstract P6.2:83},
  title        = {Dissolved silicon content in Belgian beers},
  year         = {2014},
}