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Microbial odor profile of polyester and cotton clothes after a fitness session

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Abstract
Clothing textiles protect our human body against external factors. These textiles are not sterile and can harbor high bacterial counts as sweat and bacteria are transmitted from the skin. We investigated the microbial growth and odor development in cotton and synthetic clothing fabrics. T-shirts were collected from 26 healthy individuals after an intensive bicycle spinning session and incubated for 28 h before analysis. A trained odor panel determined significant differences between polyester versus cotton fabrics for the hedonic value, the intensity, and five qualitative odor characteristics. The polyester T-shirts smelled significantly less pleasant and more intense, compared to the cotton T-shirts. A dissimilar bacterial growth was found in cotton versus synthetic clothing textiles. Micrococci were isolated in almost all synthetic shirts and were detected almost solely on synthetic shirts by means of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprinting. A selective enrichment of micrococci in an in vitro growth experiment confirmed the presence of these species on polyester. Staphylococci were abundant on both cotton and synthetic fabrics. Corynebacteria were not enriched on any textile type. This research found that the composition of clothing fibers promotes differential growth of textile microbes and, as such, determines possible malodor generation.
Keywords
16S RIBOSOMAL-RNA, GRADIENT GEL-ELECTROPHORESIS, HUMAN SKIN, AXILLARY ODOR, FABRICS, TEXTILES, BACTERIA, POPULATIONS, METABOLISM, CHITOSAN

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Chicago
Callewaert, Chris, Evelyn De Maeseneire, Frederiek-Maarten Kerckhof, Arne Verliefde, Tom Van de Wiele, and Nico Boon. 2014. “Microbial Odor Profile of Polyester and Cotton Clothes After a Fitness Session.” Applied and Environmental Microbiology 80 (21): 6611–6619.
APA
Callewaert, C., De Maeseneire, E., Kerckhof, F.-M., Verliefde, A., Van de Wiele, T., & Boon, N. (2014). Microbial odor profile of polyester and cotton clothes after a fitness session. APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, 80(21), 6611–6619.
Vancouver
1.
Callewaert C, De Maeseneire E, Kerckhof F-M, Verliefde A, Van de Wiele T, Boon N. Microbial odor profile of polyester and cotton clothes after a fitness session. APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY. 2014;80(21):6611–9.
MLA
Callewaert, Chris, Evelyn De Maeseneire, Frederiek-Maarten Kerckhof, et al. “Microbial Odor Profile of Polyester and Cotton Clothes After a Fitness Session.” APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY 80.21 (2014): 6611–6619. Print.
@article{5788939,
  abstract     = {Clothing textiles protect our human body against external factors. These textiles are not sterile and can harbor high bacterial counts as sweat and bacteria are transmitted from the skin. We investigated the microbial growth and odor development in cotton and synthetic clothing fabrics. T-shirts were collected from 26 healthy individuals after an intensive bicycle spinning session and incubated for 28 h before analysis. A trained odor panel determined significant differences between polyester versus cotton fabrics for the hedonic value, the intensity, and five qualitative odor characteristics. The polyester T-shirts smelled significantly less pleasant and more intense, compared to the cotton T-shirts. A dissimilar bacterial growth was found in cotton versus synthetic clothing textiles. Micrococci were isolated in almost all synthetic shirts and were detected almost solely on synthetic shirts by means of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprinting. A selective enrichment of micrococci in an in vitro growth experiment confirmed the presence of these species on polyester. Staphylococci were abundant on both cotton and synthetic fabrics. Corynebacteria were not enriched on any textile type. This research found that the composition of clothing fibers promotes differential growth of textile microbes and, as such, determines possible malodor generation.},
  author       = {Callewaert, Chris and De Maeseneire, Evelyn and Kerckhof, Frederiek-Maarten and Verliefde, Arne and Van de Wiele, Tom and Boon, Nico},
  issn         = {0099-2240},
  journal      = {APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY},
  keyword      = {16S RIBOSOMAL-RNA,GRADIENT GEL-ELECTROPHORESIS,HUMAN SKIN,AXILLARY ODOR,FABRICS,TEXTILES,BACTERIA,POPULATIONS,METABOLISM,CHITOSAN},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {21},
  pages        = {6611--6619},
  title        = {Microbial odor profile of polyester and cotton clothes after a fitness session},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AEM.01422-14},
  volume       = {80},
  year         = {2014},
}

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