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Hybridization in a corporatist third sector regime: paradoxes of 'responsibilized autonomy'

Lesley Hustinx UGent, Els De Waele UGent and Chloë Delcour UGent (2015) VOLUNTARY SECTOR REVIEW. 6(1). p.115-134
abstract
This study explores the generally prevailing diagnosis of 'hybridization' in the third sector under a new mode of governing welfare, with a focus on processes of devolution of public responsibility and 'responsibilized autonomy' for third sector organizations (TSOs) and volunteers. To this end we conducted semi-structured in-depth interviews with representatives from field-specific umbrella organizations and with officials working in independent governmental agencies. Our analysis generally deals with three themes: devolution of responsibility, accountability, and volunteers as responsibilized service providers. Our findings reveal four paradoxes or unintended consequences of 'responsibilized autonomy': decreased autonomy for TSOs, an administrative deadlock that crowds out grassroots associations and volunteers, an increasing demand for professional support for volunteering, and a bifurcation between strong and weak volunteers, whereby the latter are 're-excluded' through volunteering.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
welfare mix, community government, hybridization, volunteering
journal title
VOLUNTARY SECTOR REVIEW
volume
6
issue
1
pages
115 - 134
publisher
Policy Press
ISSN
2040-8056
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A2
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
VABB id
c:vabb:399956
VABB type
VABB-1
id
5784753
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-5784753
date created
2014-12-17 12:08:32
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:46:50
@article{5784753,
  abstract     = {This study explores the generally prevailing diagnosis of 'hybridization' in the third sector under a new mode of governing welfare, with a focus on processes of devolution of public responsibility and 'responsibilized autonomy' for third sector organizations (TSOs) and volunteers. To this end we conducted semi-structured in-depth interviews with representatives from field-specific umbrella organizations and with officials working in independent governmental agencies. Our analysis generally deals with three themes: devolution of responsibility, accountability, and volunteers as responsibilized service providers. Our findings reveal four paradoxes or unintended consequences of 'responsibilized autonomy': decreased autonomy for TSOs, an administrative deadlock that crowds out grassroots associations and volunteers, an increasing demand for professional support for volunteering, and a bifurcation between strong and weak volunteers, whereby the latter are 're-excluded' through volunteering.},
  author       = {Hustinx, Lesley and De Waele, Els and Delcour, Chlo{\"e}},
  issn         = {2040-8056},
  journal      = {VOLUNTARY SECTOR REVIEW},
  keyword      = {welfare mix,community government,hybridization,volunteering},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {115--134},
  publisher    = {Policy Press},
  title        = {Hybridization in a corporatist third sector regime: paradoxes of 'responsibilized autonomy'},
  volume       = {6},
  year         = {2015},
}

Chicago
Hustinx, Lesley, Els De Waele, and Chloë Delcour. 2015. “Hybridization in a Corporatist Third Sector Regime: Paradoxes of ‘Responsibilized Autonomy’.” Voluntary Sector Review 6 (1): 115–134.
APA
Hustinx, L., De Waele, E., & Delcour, C. (2015). Hybridization in a corporatist third sector regime: paradoxes of “responsibilized autonomy.” VOLUNTARY SECTOR REVIEW, 6(1), 115–134.
Vancouver
1.
Hustinx L, De Waele E, Delcour C. Hybridization in a corporatist third sector regime: paradoxes of “responsibilized autonomy.”VOLUNTARY SECTOR REVIEW. Policy Press; 2015;6(1):115–34.
MLA
Hustinx, Lesley, Els De Waele, and Chloë Delcour. “Hybridization in a Corporatist Third Sector Regime: Paradoxes of ‘Responsibilized Autonomy’.” VOLUNTARY SECTOR REVIEW 6.1 (2015): 115–134. Print.