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Association between vestibular function and motor performance in hearing-impaired children

Leen Maes (UGent) , Alexandra De Kegel (UGent) , Hilde Van Waelvelde (UGent) and Ingeborg Dhooge (UGent)
(2014) OTOLOGY & NEUROTOLOGY. 35(10). p.e343-e347
Author
Organization
Abstract
Objective: The clinical balance performance of normal-hearing (NH) children was compared with the balance performance of hearing-impaired (HI) children with and without vestibular dysfunction to identify an association between vestibular function and motor performance. Study Design: Prospective study. Setting: Tertiary referral center. Patients: Thirty-six children (mean age, 7 yr 5 mo; range, 3 yr 8 mo-12 yr 11 mo) divided into three groups: NH children with normal vestibular responses, HI children with normal vestibular responses, and HI children with abnormal vestibular function. Interventions: A vestibular test protocol (rotatory and collic vestibular evoked myogenic potential testing) in combination with three clinical balance tests (balance beam walking, one-leg hopping, one-leg stance). Main Outcome Measures: Clinical balance performance. Results: HI children with abnormal vestibular test results obtained the lowest quotients of motor performance, which were significantly lower compared with the NH group (p < 0.001 for balance beam walking and one-leg stance; p = 0.003 for one-leg hopping). The balance performance of the HI group with normal vestibular responses was better in comparison with the vestibular impaired group but still significantly lower compared with the NH group (p = 0.020 for balance beam walking; p = 0.001 for one-leg stance; not significant for one-leg hopping). Conclusion: These results indicate an association between vestibular function and motor performance in HI children, with a more distinct motor deterioration if a vestibular impairment is superimposed to the auditory dysfunction.
Keywords
Collic vestibular evoked myogenic potential tes, Rotatory test, Vestibular, Motor performance, Association, Hearing-impaired children, TEST-RETEST RELIABILITY, COCHLEAR IMPLANTS, DEAF-CHILDREN, DYSFUNCTION, PROFICIENCY, IMPAIRMENTS, DEFICITS, INFANTS

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Citation

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MLA
Maes, Leen, Alexandra De Kegel, Hilde Van Waelvelde, et al. “Association Between Vestibular Function and Motor Performance in Hearing-impaired Children.” OTOLOGY & NEUROTOLOGY 35.10 (2014): e343–e347. Print.
APA
Maes, Leen, De Kegel, A., Van Waelvelde, H., & Dhooge, I. (2014). Association between vestibular function and motor performance in hearing-impaired children. OTOLOGY & NEUROTOLOGY, 35(10), e343–e347.
Chicago author-date
Maes, Leen, Alexandra De Kegel, Hilde Van Waelvelde, and Ingeborg Dhooge. 2014. “Association Between Vestibular Function and Motor Performance in Hearing-impaired Children.” Otology & Neurotology 35 (10): e343–e347.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Maes, Leen, Alexandra De Kegel, Hilde Van Waelvelde, and Ingeborg Dhooge. 2014. “Association Between Vestibular Function and Motor Performance in Hearing-impaired Children.” Otology & Neurotology 35 (10): e343–e347.
Vancouver
1.
Maes L, De Kegel A, Van Waelvelde H, Dhooge I. Association between vestibular function and motor performance in hearing-impaired children. OTOLOGY & NEUROTOLOGY. 2014;35(10):e343–e347.
IEEE
[1]
L. Maes, A. De Kegel, H. Van Waelvelde, and I. Dhooge, “Association between vestibular function and motor performance in hearing-impaired children,” OTOLOGY & NEUROTOLOGY, vol. 35, no. 10, pp. e343–e347, 2014.
@article{5783254,
  abstract     = {Objective: The clinical balance performance of normal-hearing (NH) children was compared with the balance performance of hearing-impaired (HI) children with and without vestibular dysfunction to identify an association between vestibular function and motor performance. 
Study Design: Prospective study. 
Setting: Tertiary referral center. 
Patients: Thirty-six children (mean age, 7 yr 5 mo; range, 3 yr 8 mo-12 yr 11 mo) divided into three groups: NH children with normal vestibular responses, HI children with normal vestibular responses, and HI children with abnormal vestibular function. 
Interventions: A vestibular test protocol (rotatory and collic vestibular evoked myogenic potential testing) in combination with three clinical balance tests (balance beam walking, one-leg hopping, one-leg stance). 
Main Outcome Measures: Clinical balance performance. 
Results: HI children with abnormal vestibular test results obtained the lowest quotients of motor performance, which were significantly lower compared with the NH group (p < 0.001 for balance beam walking and one-leg stance; p = 0.003 for one-leg hopping). The balance performance of the HI group with normal vestibular responses was better in comparison with the vestibular impaired group but still significantly lower compared with the NH group (p = 0.020 for balance beam walking; p = 0.001 for one-leg stance; not significant for one-leg hopping). 
Conclusion: These results indicate an association between vestibular function and motor performance in HI children, with a more distinct motor deterioration if a vestibular impairment is superimposed to the auditory dysfunction.},
  author       = {Maes, Leen and De Kegel, Alexandra and Van Waelvelde, Hilde and Dhooge, Ingeborg},
  issn         = {1531-7129},
  journal      = {OTOLOGY & NEUROTOLOGY},
  keywords     = {Collic vestibular evoked myogenic potential tes,Rotatory test,Vestibular,Motor performance,Association,Hearing-impaired children,TEST-RETEST RELIABILITY,COCHLEAR IMPLANTS,DEAF-CHILDREN,DYSFUNCTION,PROFICIENCY,IMPAIRMENTS,DEFICITS,INFANTS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {10},
  pages        = {e343--e347},
  title        = {Association between vestibular function and motor performance in hearing-impaired children},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MAO.0000000000000597},
  volume       = {35},
  year         = {2014},
}

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