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Reversed revised: what to do when it goes wrong ?

BART MIDDERNACHT UGent, Alexander Van Tongel UGent and Lieven De Wilde UGent (2014) ACTA ORTHOPAEDICA BELGICA. 80(3). p.314-321
abstract
Reversed total shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA) has well known indications and good to excellent results are described in the literature. When the arthroplasty fails however, revision remains a technical challenge with many questions unanswered. To analyse retrospectively and consecutively the indications and results of primary RTSA-revision. All patients that underwent revision RTSA between 2004 and 2009 were included. Indications for surgery, surgical details and clinical evaluation with the pre- and postoperative Constant-score (CS) were analyzed. 37 Revisions (37 patients) of RTSA were analysed with an average follow up of 41.2 months (24-84). Indications were infection (23), glenoid loosening (9), instability (2) malpositioning (2) and suprascapular nerve irritation (1). 25 patients obtained a one-stage conversion to a new reversed prosthesis; 4 patients obtained a two-stage revision; 8 patients got a mega-head prosthesis. No difference in reinfection rate is seen between one- and two stage techniques. An overall lower CS is seen for the mega-head prosthesis. Conclusions : The main indication for revision was infection. Revision of RTSA to a new reversed prosthesis is to prefer even when several procedures are necessary in one patient. When this is impossible, a mega-head prosthesis is to consider and gives reasonable results.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
complications, infection, revision, Reversed, total shoulder prosthesis, TOTAL SHOULDER ARTHROPLASTY, REPLACEMENT, FAILURE, malpositioning, dislocation
journal title
ACTA ORTHOPAEDICA BELGICA
Acta Orthop. Belg.
volume
80
issue
3
pages
314 - 321
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000343848000005
JCR category
ORTHOPEDICS
JCR impact factor
0.654 (2014)
JCR rank
58/72 (2014)
JCR quartile
4 (2014)
ISSN
0001-6462
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
5780526
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-5780526
date created
2014-12-11 11:44:30
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:39:52
@article{5780526,
  abstract     = {Reversed total shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA) has well known indications and good to excellent results are described in the literature. When the arthroplasty fails however, revision remains a technical challenge with many questions unanswered. 
To analyse retrospectively and consecutively the indications and results of primary RTSA-revision. 
All patients that underwent revision RTSA between 2004 and 2009 were included. Indications for surgery, surgical details and clinical evaluation with the pre- and postoperative Constant-score (CS) were analyzed. 37 Revisions (37 patients) of RTSA were analysed with an average follow up of 41.2 months (24-84). Indications were infection (23), glenoid loosening (9), instability (2) malpositioning (2) and suprascapular nerve irritation (1). 25 patients obtained a one-stage conversion to a new reversed prosthesis; 4 patients obtained a two-stage revision; 8 patients got a mega-head prosthesis. No difference in reinfection rate is seen between one- and two stage techniques. An overall lower CS is seen for the mega-head prosthesis. 
Conclusions : The main indication for revision was infection. Revision of RTSA to a new reversed prosthesis is to prefer even when several procedures are necessary in one patient. When this is impossible, a mega-head prosthesis is to consider and gives reasonable results.},
  author       = {MIDDERNACHT, BART and Van Tongel, Alexander and De Wilde, Lieven},
  issn         = {0001-6462},
  journal      = {ACTA ORTHOPAEDICA BELGICA},
  keyword      = {complications,infection,revision,Reversed,total shoulder prosthesis,TOTAL SHOULDER ARTHROPLASTY,REPLACEMENT,FAILURE,malpositioning,dislocation},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {314--321},
  title        = {Reversed revised: what to do when it goes wrong ?},
  volume       = {80},
  year         = {2014},
}

Chicago
MIDDERNACHT, BART, Alexander Van Tongel, and Lieven De Wilde. 2014. “Reversed Revised: What to Do When It Goes Wrong ?” Acta Orthopaedica Belgica 80 (3): 314–321.
APA
MIDDERNACHT, B., Van Tongel, A., & De Wilde, L. (2014). Reversed revised: what to do when it goes wrong ? ACTA ORTHOPAEDICA BELGICA, 80(3), 314–321.
Vancouver
1.
MIDDERNACHT B, Van Tongel A, De Wilde L. Reversed revised: what to do when it goes wrong ? ACTA ORTHOPAEDICA BELGICA. 2014;80(3):314–21.
MLA
MIDDERNACHT, BART, Alexander Van Tongel, and Lieven De Wilde. “Reversed Revised: What to Do When It Goes Wrong ?” ACTA ORTHOPAEDICA BELGICA 80.3 (2014): 314–321. Print.