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Species-area relationships are modulated by trophic rank, habitat affinity and dispersal ability

Toos van Noordwijk, Wilco CEP Verberk, Hans Turin, Theodoor Heijerman, Kees Alders, Wouter Dekonick, Karsten Hannig, Eugenie C Regan, Stephen McCormack, Mark JF Brown, et al. (2015) ECOLOGY. 96(2). p.518-531
abstract
In the face of ongoing habitat fragmentation, species-area relationships (SARs) have gained renewed interest and are increasingly used to set conservation priorities. An important question is how large habitat areas need to be to optimize biodiversity conservation. The relationship between area and species richness is explained by colonization-extinction dynamics, whereby smaller sites harbor smaller populations, which are more prone to extinction than the larger populations sustained by larger sites. These colonization-extinction dynamics are predicted to vary with trophic rank, habitat affinity, and dispersal ability of the species. However, empirical evidence for the effect of these species characteristics on SARs remains inconclusive. In this study we used carabid beetle data from 58 calcareous grassland sites to investigate how calcareous grassland area affects species richness and activity density for species differing in trophic rank, habitat affinity, and dispersal ability. In addition, we investigated how SARs are affected by the availability of additional calcareous grassland in the surrounding landscape. Beetle species richness and activity density increased with calcareous grassland area for zoophagous species that are specialists for dry grasslands and, to a lesser extent, for zoophagous habitat generalists. Phytophagous species and zoophagous forest and wet-grassland specialists were not affected by calcareous grassland area. The dependence of species on large single sites increased with decreasing dispersal ability for species already vulnerable to calcareous grassland area. Additional calcareous grassland in the landscape had a positive effect on local species richness of both dry-grassland specialists and generalists, but this effect was restricted to a few hundred meters. Our results demonstrate that SARs are affected by trophic rank, habitat affinity, and dispersal ability. These species characteristics do not operate independently, but should be viewed in concert. In addition, species' responses depend on the landscape context. Our study suggests that the impact of habitat area on trophic interactions may be larger than previously anticipated. In small habitat fragments surrounded by a hostile matrix, food chains may be strongly disrupted. This highlights the need to conserve continuous calcareous grassland patches of at least several hectares in size.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
northwestern Europe, carabid beetles, trophic level, ABUNDANCE-OCCUPANCY RELATIONSHIPS, generalist vs, community, flight ability, food chain, fragmentation, specialist, SAR, GROUND BEETLES COLEOPTERA, CALCAREOUS GRASSLANDS, INSECT COMMUNITIES, POPULATION-DENSITY, FOREST FRAGMENTS, TROPICAL FOREST, BODY-SIZE, TRAITS, CONSERVATION, calcareous grasslands, biodiversity conservation, body size
journal title
ECOLOGY
Ecology
volume
96
issue
2
pages
518 - 531
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000350484600023
JCR category
ECOLOGY
JCR impact factor
4.733 (2015)
JCR rank
20/149 (2015)
JCR quartile
1 (2015)
ISSN
0012-9658
DOI
10.1890/14-0082.1
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
5776976
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-5776976
date created
2014-12-09 11:12:37
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:46:52
@article{5776976,
  abstract     = {In the face of ongoing habitat fragmentation, species-area relationships (SARs) have gained renewed interest and are increasingly used to set conservation priorities. An important question is how large habitat areas need to be to optimize biodiversity conservation. The relationship between area and species richness is explained by colonization-extinction dynamics, whereby smaller sites harbor smaller populations, which are more prone to extinction than the larger populations sustained by larger sites. These colonization-extinction dynamics are predicted to vary with trophic rank, habitat affinity, and dispersal ability of the species. However, empirical evidence for the effect of these species characteristics on SARs remains inconclusive. In this study we used carabid beetle data from 58 calcareous grassland sites to investigate how calcareous grassland area affects species richness and activity density for species differing in trophic rank, habitat affinity, and dispersal ability. In addition, we investigated how SARs are affected by the availability of additional calcareous grassland in the surrounding landscape. Beetle species richness and activity density increased with calcareous grassland area for zoophagous species that are specialists for dry grasslands and, to a lesser extent, for zoophagous habitat generalists. Phytophagous species and zoophagous forest and wet-grassland specialists were not affected by calcareous grassland area. The dependence of species on large single sites increased with decreasing dispersal ability for species already vulnerable to calcareous grassland area. Additional calcareous grassland in the landscape had a positive effect on local species richness of both dry-grassland specialists and generalists, but this effect was restricted to a few hundred meters. Our results demonstrate that SARs are affected by trophic rank, habitat affinity, and dispersal ability. These species characteristics do not operate independently, but should be viewed in concert. In addition, species' responses depend on the landscape context. Our study suggests that the impact of habitat area on trophic interactions may be larger than previously anticipated. In small habitat fragments surrounded by a hostile matrix, food chains may be strongly disrupted. This highlights the need to conserve continuous calcareous grassland patches of at least several hectares in size.},
  author       = {van Noordwijk, Toos and Verberk, Wilco CEP and Turin, Hans and Heijerman, Theodoor and Alders, Kees and Dekonick, Wouter and Hannig, Karsten and Regan, Eugenie C and McCormack, Stephen and Brown, Mark JF and Remke, Eva and Siepel, Henk and Berg, Matty P and Bonte, Dries},
  issn         = {0012-9658},
  journal      = {ECOLOGY},
  keyword      = {northwestern Europe,carabid beetles,trophic level,ABUNDANCE-OCCUPANCY RELATIONSHIPS,generalist vs,community,flight ability,food chain,fragmentation,specialist,SAR,GROUND BEETLES COLEOPTERA,CALCAREOUS GRASSLANDS,INSECT COMMUNITIES,POPULATION-DENSITY,FOREST FRAGMENTS,TROPICAL FOREST,BODY-SIZE,TRAITS,CONSERVATION,calcareous grasslands,biodiversity conservation,body size},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {518--531},
  title        = {Species-area relationships are modulated by trophic rank, habitat affinity and dispersal ability},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/14-0082.1},
  volume       = {96},
  year         = {2015},
}

Chicago
van Noordwijk, Toos, Wilco CEP Verberk, Hans Turin, Theodoor Heijerman, Kees Alders, Wouter Dekonick, Karsten Hannig, et al. 2015. “Species-area Relationships Are Modulated by Trophic Rank, Habitat Affinity and Dispersal Ability.” Ecology 96 (2): 518–531.
APA
van Noordwijk, T., Verberk, W. C., Turin, H., Heijerman, T., Alders, K., Dekonick, W., Hannig, K., et al. (2015). Species-area relationships are modulated by trophic rank, habitat affinity and dispersal ability. ECOLOGY, 96(2), 518–531.
Vancouver
1.
van Noordwijk T, Verberk WC, Turin H, Heijerman T, Alders K, Dekonick W, et al. Species-area relationships are modulated by trophic rank, habitat affinity and dispersal ability. ECOLOGY. 2015;96(2):518–31.
MLA
van Noordwijk, Toos, Wilco CEP Verberk, Hans Turin, et al. “Species-area Relationships Are Modulated by Trophic Rank, Habitat Affinity and Dispersal Ability.” ECOLOGY 96.2 (2015): 518–531. Print.