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Famines : causes and impact

Eric Vanhaute (UGent)
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Abstract
In social sciences, the focus in famine research has shifted toward famines as ‘community crises’, where scarcity and human suffering is accompanied and aggravated by social breakdown1 . Communities lose their ability to support a significant portion of their members, causing accelerated destitution and fearful reactions related to one’s decreasing ‘command over food’. That is why famines are unique experiences that occupy a finite span of historical time and human experience. At the same time, they are recurring patterns that reveal insight into a society’s deeper and more enduring tensions and difficulties. The notion of famine as an event (sudden crisis), process (accelerated destitution) and structure (the breakdown of societal networks) creates the need for an integrated and historical famine research model. The guiding questions in this essay are: (a) How do we detect and measure famines?, (b) How do we explain famines?, (c) How do we assess the impact of famines?, and (d) How is the historical trajectory of famines related to contemporary hunger and food crises?

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Vanhaute, Eric. “Famines : Causes and Impact.” The Routledge Handbook on Food and Nutrition Security. Ed. Bill Pritchard, Rodomiro Ortiz, & Meera Shekar. Routledge, 2016. 227–239. Print.
APA
Vanhaute, E. (2016). Famines : causes and impact. In B. Pritchard, R. Ortiz, & M. Shekar (Eds.), The Routledge Handbook on food and nutrition security (pp. 227–239). Routledge.
Chicago author-date
Vanhaute, Eric. 2016. “Famines : Causes and Impact.” In The Routledge Handbook on Food and Nutrition Security, ed. Bill Pritchard, Rodomiro Ortiz, and Meera Shekar, 227–239. Routledge.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Vanhaute, Eric. 2016. “Famines : Causes and Impact.” In The Routledge Handbook on Food and Nutrition Security, ed. Bill Pritchard, Rodomiro Ortiz, and Meera Shekar, 227–239. Routledge.
Vancouver
1.
Vanhaute E. Famines : causes and impact. In: Pritchard B, Ortiz R, Shekar M, editors. The Routledge Handbook on food and nutrition security. Routledge; 2016. p. 227–39.
IEEE
[1]
E. Vanhaute, “Famines : causes and impact,” in The Routledge Handbook on food and nutrition security, B. Pritchard, R. Ortiz, and M. Shekar, Eds. Routledge, 2016, pp. 227–239.
@incollection{5774919,
  abstract     = {In social sciences, the focus in famine research has shifted toward famines as ‘community
crises’, where scarcity and human suffering is accompanied and aggravated by social
breakdown1
. Communities lose their ability to support a significant portion of their
members, causing accelerated destitution and fearful reactions related to one’s decreasing
‘command over food’. That is why famines are unique experiences that occupy a finite span
of historical time and human experience. At the same time, they are recurring patterns that
reveal insight into a society’s deeper and more enduring tensions and difficulties. The notion
of famine as an event (sudden crisis), process (accelerated destitution) and structure (the
breakdown of societal networks) creates the need for an integrated and historical famine
research model. The guiding questions in this essay are: (a) How do we detect and measure
famines?, (b) How do we explain famines?, (c) How do we assess the impact of famines?,
and (d) How is the historical trajectory of famines related to contemporary hunger and food
crises?},
  author       = {Vanhaute, Eric},
  booktitle    = {The Routledge Handbook on food and nutrition security},
  editor       = {Pritchard, Bill and Ortiz, Rodomiro and Shekar, Meera},
  isbn         = {9781138817197},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {227--239},
  publisher    = {Routledge},
  title        = {Famines : causes and impact},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.4324/9781315745749},
  year         = {2016},
}

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