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Genetic differentiation of Artemia franciscana (Kellogg, 1906) in Kenyan coastal saltworks

Erick Ochieng Ogello, Betty M Nyonje and Gilbert Van Stappen UGent (2014) INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ADVANCED RESEARCH. 2(4). p.1154-1164
abstract
The nature of genetic divergence between the Artemia population native to San Francisco Bay, (SFB) USA and those from the introductions of SFB material in the Kenyan coast two decades ago were investigated using the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) gene molecular markers. The DNA was extracted from 80 single Artemia cysts using the Chelex protocol. The 1,500 bp fragment of the 12S - 16S region of the mtDNA and a 1,935 bp fragment of the Hsp70 gene were amplified through Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) followed by Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) digestion using appropriate endonucleases. The mtDNA analysis indicated higher haplotype diversity (0.76 ± 0.07) in Artemia from Fundisha saltworks while the rest of the samples were monomorphic. A private haplotype (AAABBA) in Fundisha samples confirmed a molecular evidence of a systematic genetic differentiation albeit in an insignificant manner (P > 0.05). There was molecular evidence of coexistence of SFB and GSL Artemia strains in Fundisha saltworks. The monomorphic DNA fingerprint in Kensalt Artemia cysts was probably caused by non-sequential Artemia culture system and limited mtDNA fragment size analysed. The Hsp70 gene RFLP fingerprint did not show any unique gene signatures in the Kenyan Artemia samples suggesting that other factors other than Hsp70 were involved in their superior thermotolerance. Further genetical studies based on the larger mtDNA fragment using robust genetic markers are recommended. Ecological studies of the heat shock protein family and the stress response would be more relevant than the qualitative RFLP technique.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
RFLP, mtDNA, Kenya, Artemia franciscana, Heat shock protein
journal title
INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ADVANCED RESEARCH
Int. J. Adv. Res.
volume
2
issue
4
pages
1154 - 1164
ISSN
2320-5407
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A2
copyright statement
I have retained and own the full copyright for this publication
id
5769754
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-5769754
alternative location
http://journalijar.com/uploads/33_IJAR-3224.pdf
date created
2014-12-03 09:35:15
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:39:09
@article{5769754,
  abstract     = {The nature of genetic divergence between the Artemia population native to San Francisco Bay, (SFB) USA and those from the introductions of SFB material in the Kenyan coast two decades ago were investigated using the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) gene molecular markers. The DNA was extracted from 80 single Artemia cysts using the Chelex protocol. The 1,500 bp fragment of the 12S - 16S region of the mtDNA and a 1,935 bp fragment of the Hsp70 gene were amplified through Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) followed by Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) digestion using appropriate endonucleases. The mtDNA analysis indicated higher haplotype diversity (0.76 {\textpm} 0.07) in Artemia from Fundisha saltworks while the rest of the samples were monomorphic. A private haplotype (AAABBA) in Fundisha samples confirmed a molecular evidence of a systematic genetic differentiation albeit in an insignificant manner (P {\textrangle} 0.05). There was molecular evidence of coexistence of SFB and GSL Artemia strains in Fundisha saltworks. The monomorphic DNA fingerprint in Kensalt Artemia cysts was probably caused by non-sequential Artemia culture system and limited mtDNA fragment size analysed. The Hsp70 gene RFLP fingerprint did not show any unique gene signatures in the Kenyan Artemia samples suggesting that other factors other than Hsp70 were involved in their superior thermotolerance. Further genetical studies based on the larger mtDNA fragment using robust genetic markers are recommended. Ecological studies of the heat shock protein family and the stress response would be more relevant than the qualitative RFLP technique.},
  author       = {Ogello, Erick Ochieng and Nyonje, Betty M and Van Stappen, Gilbert},
  issn         = {2320-5407},
  journal      = {INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ADVANCED RESEARCH},
  keyword      = {RFLP,mtDNA,Kenya,Artemia franciscana,Heat shock protein},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {1154--1164},
  title        = {Genetic differentiation of Artemia franciscana (Kellogg, 1906) in Kenyan coastal saltworks},
  url          = {http://journalijar.com/uploads/33\_IJAR-3224.pdf},
  volume       = {2},
  year         = {2014},
}

Chicago
Ogello, Erick Ochieng, Betty M Nyonje, and Gilbert Van Stappen. 2014. “Genetic Differentiation of Artemia Franciscana (Kellogg, 1906) in Kenyan Coastal Saltworks.” International Journal of Advanced Research 2 (4): 1154–1164.
APA
Ogello, E. O., Nyonje, B. M., & Van Stappen, G. (2014). Genetic differentiation of Artemia franciscana (Kellogg, 1906) in Kenyan coastal saltworks. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ADVANCED RESEARCH, 2(4), 1154–1164.
Vancouver
1.
Ogello EO, Nyonje BM, Van Stappen G. Genetic differentiation of Artemia franciscana (Kellogg, 1906) in Kenyan coastal saltworks. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ADVANCED RESEARCH. 2014;2(4):1154–64.
MLA
Ogello, Erick Ochieng, Betty M Nyonje, and Gilbert Van Stappen. “Genetic Differentiation of Artemia Franciscana (Kellogg, 1906) in Kenyan Coastal Saltworks.” INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ADVANCED RESEARCH 2.4 (2014): 1154–1164. Print.