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Labour market discrimination against former juvenile delinquents: evidence from a field experiment

Stijn Baert (UGent) and Elsy Verhofstadt (UGent)
(2015) APPLIED ECONOMICS. 47(11). p.1061-1072
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Abstract
In view of policy action to integrate ex-offenders into society, it is important to identify the underlying mechanisms of the negative relationship between criminal record on the one hand and later employment and earnings on the other hand. In this study, we identify hiring discrimination against former juvenile delinquents in a direct way. To this end, we conduct a field experiment in the Belgian labour market. We find that labour market discrimination is indeed a major barrier in the transition to work for former juvenile delinquents. Labour market entrants disclosing a history of juvenile delinquency get about 22 percent less callback compared to their counterparts without a criminal record. This discrimination is heterogeneous by the occupation for which one applies.
Keywords
PAST UNEMPLOYMENT, FUTURE UNEMPLOYMENT, EMPLOYMENT, field experiments, juvenile delinquency, hiring discrimination, PSYCHOLOGICAL IMPACT, INCARCERATION, EARNINGS, INCOME, CONVICTION, CRIME, DETECTING DISCRIMINATION

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MLA
Baert, Stijn, and Elsy Verhofstadt. “Labour Market Discrimination Against Former Juvenile Delinquents: Evidence from a Field Experiment.” APPLIED ECONOMICS 47.11 (2015): 1061–1072. Print.
APA
Baert, Stijn, & Verhofstadt, E. (2015). Labour market discrimination against former juvenile delinquents: evidence from a field experiment. APPLIED ECONOMICS, 47(11), 1061–1072.
Chicago author-date
Baert, Stijn, and Elsy Verhofstadt. 2015. “Labour Market Discrimination Against Former Juvenile Delinquents: Evidence from a Field Experiment.” Applied Economics 47 (11): 1061–1072.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Baert, Stijn, and Elsy Verhofstadt. 2015. “Labour Market Discrimination Against Former Juvenile Delinquents: Evidence from a Field Experiment.” Applied Economics 47 (11): 1061–1072.
Vancouver
1.
Baert S, Verhofstadt E. Labour market discrimination against former juvenile delinquents: evidence from a field experiment. APPLIED ECONOMICS. 2015;47(11):1061–72.
IEEE
[1]
S. Baert and E. Verhofstadt, “Labour market discrimination against former juvenile delinquents: evidence from a field experiment,” APPLIED ECONOMICS, vol. 47, no. 11, pp. 1061–1072, 2015.
@article{5757543,
  abstract     = {In view of policy action to integrate ex-offenders into society, it is important to identify the underlying mechanisms of the negative relationship between criminal record on the one hand and later employment and earnings on the other hand. In this study, we identify hiring discrimination against former juvenile delinquents in a direct way. To this end, we conduct a field experiment in the Belgian labour market. We find that labour market discrimination is indeed a major barrier in the transition to work for former juvenile delinquents. Labour market entrants disclosing a history of juvenile delinquency get about 22 percent less callback compared to their counterparts without a criminal record. This discrimination is heterogeneous by the occupation for which one applies.},
  author       = {Baert, Stijn and Verhofstadt, Elsy},
  issn         = {0003-6846},
  journal      = {APPLIED ECONOMICS},
  keywords     = {PAST UNEMPLOYMENT,FUTURE UNEMPLOYMENT,EMPLOYMENT,field experiments,juvenile delinquency,hiring discrimination,PSYCHOLOGICAL IMPACT,INCARCERATION,EARNINGS,INCOME,CONVICTION,CRIME,DETECTING DISCRIMINATION},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {11},
  pages        = {1061--1072},
  title        = {Labour market discrimination against former juvenile delinquents: evidence from a field experiment},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00036846.2014.990620},
  volume       = {47},
  year         = {2015},
}

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