Advanced search
1 file | 167.97 KB Add to list

On intergenerational differences in highbrow cultural participation. Is the Internet at home an explanatory factor in understanding lower highbrow participation among younger cohorts?

Astrid Van Steen (UGent) , Jef Vlegels (UGent) and John Lievens (UGent)
Author
Organization
Abstract
This article uses a series of cross-sectional data sets from 2001 to 2010 to study differences in highbrow cultural participation among subsequent generations in Belgium. Using an Age-Period-Cohort model, we first assess whether and to what degree highbrow cultural participation differs between birth cohorts, age groups, and periods. Second, we examine whether or not having Internet access at home is a contributing factor in understanding intergenerational differences. We assess whether Internet access at home enhances or displaces highbrow cultural participation and look into the different effects of Internet access on different generations. Results suggest that highbrow cultural participation is indeed declining among younger cohorts, indicating a weakening position of highbrow culture in the lives of young people. But, having Internet access at home cannot be regarded as a competitive force for highbrow participation. On the contrary, Internet access is associated with higher levels of highbrow cultural participation. Moreover, this positive association is most pronounced in the youngest birth cohorts.
Keywords
highbrow cultural participation, OMNIVORE, APC-model, Internet, longitudinal, ARTS PARTICIPATION, OMNIVOROUSNESS, TASTE, DISPLACEMENT, TECHNOLOGY, SOCIAL SURVEY GSS

Downloads

  • (...).pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 167.97 KB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Van Steen, Astrid, et al. “On Intergenerational Differences in Highbrow Cultural Participation. Is the Internet at Home an Explanatory Factor in Understanding Lower Highbrow Participation among Younger Cohorts?” INFORMATION COMMUNICATION & SOCIETY, vol. 18, no. 6, 2015, pp. 595–607, doi:10.1080/1369118X.2014.967268.
APA
Van Steen, A., Vlegels, J., & Lievens, J. (2015). On intergenerational differences in highbrow cultural participation. Is the Internet at home an explanatory factor in understanding lower highbrow participation among younger cohorts? INFORMATION COMMUNICATION & SOCIETY, 18(6), 595–607. https://doi.org/10.1080/1369118X.2014.967268
Chicago author-date
Van Steen, Astrid, Jef Vlegels, and John Lievens. 2015. “On Intergenerational Differences in Highbrow Cultural Participation. Is the Internet at Home an Explanatory Factor in Understanding Lower Highbrow Participation among Younger Cohorts?” INFORMATION COMMUNICATION & SOCIETY 18 (6): 595–607. https://doi.org/10.1080/1369118X.2014.967268.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Van Steen, Astrid, Jef Vlegels, and John Lievens. 2015. “On Intergenerational Differences in Highbrow Cultural Participation. Is the Internet at Home an Explanatory Factor in Understanding Lower Highbrow Participation among Younger Cohorts?” INFORMATION COMMUNICATION & SOCIETY 18 (6): 595–607. doi:10.1080/1369118X.2014.967268.
Vancouver
1.
Van Steen A, Vlegels J, Lievens J. On intergenerational differences in highbrow cultural participation. Is the Internet at home an explanatory factor in understanding lower highbrow participation among younger cohorts? INFORMATION COMMUNICATION & SOCIETY. 2015;18(6):595–607.
IEEE
[1]
A. Van Steen, J. Vlegels, and J. Lievens, “On intergenerational differences in highbrow cultural participation. Is the Internet at home an explanatory factor in understanding lower highbrow participation among younger cohorts?,” INFORMATION COMMUNICATION & SOCIETY, vol. 18, no. 6, pp. 595–607, 2015.
@article{5752938,
  abstract     = {{This article uses a series of cross-sectional data sets from 2001 to 2010 to study differences in highbrow cultural participation among subsequent generations in Belgium. Using an Age-Period-Cohort model, we first assess whether and to what degree highbrow cultural participation differs between birth cohorts, age groups, and periods. Second, we examine whether or not having Internet access at home is a contributing factor in understanding intergenerational differences. We assess whether Internet access at home enhances or displaces highbrow cultural participation and look into the different effects of Internet access on different generations. Results suggest that highbrow cultural participation is indeed declining among younger cohorts, indicating a weakening position of highbrow culture in the lives of young people. But, having Internet access at home cannot be regarded as a competitive force for highbrow participation. On the contrary, Internet access is associated with higher levels of highbrow cultural participation. Moreover, this positive association is most pronounced in the youngest birth cohorts.}},
  author       = {{Van Steen, Astrid and Vlegels, Jef and Lievens, John}},
  issn         = {{1369-118X}},
  journal      = {{INFORMATION COMMUNICATION & SOCIETY}},
  keywords     = {{highbrow cultural participation,OMNIVORE,APC-model,Internet,longitudinal,ARTS PARTICIPATION,OMNIVOROUSNESS,TASTE,DISPLACEMENT,TECHNOLOGY,SOCIAL SURVEY GSS}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  number       = {{6}},
  pages        = {{595--607}},
  title        = {{On intergenerational differences in highbrow cultural participation. Is the Internet at home an explanatory factor in understanding lower highbrow participation among younger cohorts?}},
  url          = {{http://doi.org/10.1080/1369118X.2014.967268}},
  volume       = {{18}},
  year         = {{2015}},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric
Web of Science
Times cited: