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Vocatives and speech act pojections: a case study in West Flemish

(2014) On peripheries. p.209-236
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FWO 2009-Odysseus-Haegeman-G091409
Abstract
The aim of this paper is to present a syntactic analysis of the distribution of vocatives in West Flemish (WF), a dialect of Dutch. Specifically we will focus our discussion on the positioning of vocatives in relation to discourse particles on the edge of the utterance. This relation is important because both vocatives and the particles discussed serve to generate a direct address and to qualify the conversational set up. We will label these particles ‘direct address particles’. The paper combines insights drawn from Hill’s work on vocatives (2007, to appear) and from our work on utterance-peripheral direct addresss particles (Haegeman 2010, to appear, Haegeman and Hill 2012, to appear). By looking at vocatives in relation to particles our paper raises questions concerning the relation between phenomena that are considered to be purely ‘syntactic’ and those that are discourse related. It has been noticed in the descriptive grammars of languages from various genetic groups (e.g., Schadeberg 1990 for Umbundu) that there is a privileged relation between vocatives and injunctive particles, but this relation has rarely been explored in terms of the formal syntactic literature. Left-peripheral direct address particles have also received a lot of attention in the context of discourse studies but again, with some notable exceptions such as Munaro & Poletto (2004), del Gobbo & Poletto (2008), Hill (2008), Haegeman (to appear), Haegeman and Hill (2010, 2012), have often been left aside by syntacticians. In line with the papers cited, we adopt the hypothesis that a syntactic account of utterance-peripheral direct address particles is viable, and we will show how it may be deployed to capture aspects of the syntax of vocatives. Of particular interest to us is the fact that, in the cartographic approach, Force is the head with clause typing features, which is also seen as the edge of the narrow syntax configuration (equating the phase head C in Chomsky 2001). Since both utterance-peripheral particles and vocatives (Moro 2003) appear above the ForceP level, the data we are examining suggest that the narrow syntax extends beyond the ForceP layer. This conclusion is in line with a long standing tradition going back to Ross (1970) and Banfield (1982), among others, and is continued with different implementations by, among others, Miyagawa (2012), Sigurdsson (2004), Giorgi (2010) and Giorgi & Pianesi (2004), Zu (2011).
Keywords
vocative, West Flemish, speech act projection, cartography, discourse particles

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Citation

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MLA
Haegeman, Liliane, and Virginia Hill. “Vocatives and Speech Act Pojections: a Case Study in West Flemish.” On Peripheries. Ed. Anna Cardinaletti, Guglielmo Cinque, & Yoshio Endo. Tokyo, Japan: Hituzi Syobo Publishing, 2014. 209–236. Print.
APA
Haegeman, L., & Hill, V. (2014). Vocatives and speech act pojections: a case study in West Flemish. In A. Cardinaletti, G. Cinque, & Y. Endo (Eds.), On peripheries (pp. 209–236). Tokyo, Japan: Hituzi Syobo Publishing.
Chicago author-date
Haegeman, Liliane, and Virginia Hill. 2014. “Vocatives and Speech Act Pojections: a Case Study in West Flemish.” In On Peripheries, ed. Anna Cardinaletti, Guglielmo Cinque, and Yoshio Endo, 209–236. Tokyo, Japan: Hituzi Syobo Publishing.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Haegeman, Liliane, and Virginia Hill. 2014. “Vocatives and Speech Act Pojections: a Case Study in West Flemish.” In On Peripheries, ed. Anna Cardinaletti, Guglielmo Cinque, and Yoshio Endo, 209–236. Tokyo, Japan: Hituzi Syobo Publishing.
Vancouver
1.
Haegeman L, Hill V. Vocatives and speech act pojections: a case study in West Flemish. In: Cardinaletti A, Cinque G, Endo Y, editors. On peripheries. Tokyo, Japan: Hituzi Syobo Publishing; 2014. p. 209–36.
IEEE
[1]
L. Haegeman and V. Hill, “Vocatives and speech act pojections: a case study in West Flemish,” in On peripheries, A. Cardinaletti, G. Cinque, and Y. Endo, Eds. Tokyo, Japan: Hituzi Syobo Publishing, 2014, pp. 209–236.
@incollection{5750464,
  abstract     = {The aim of this paper is to present a syntactic analysis of the distribution of vocatives in West Flemish (WF), a dialect of Dutch. Specifically we will focus our discussion on the positioning of vocatives in relation to discourse particles on the edge of the utterance. This relation is important because both vocatives and the particles discussed serve to generate a direct address and to qualify the conversational set up. We will label these particles ‘direct address particles’. The paper combines insights drawn from Hill’s work on vocatives (2007, to appear) and from our work on utterance-peripheral direct addresss particles (Haegeman 2010, to appear, Haegeman and Hill 2012, to appear). By looking at vocatives in relation to particles our paper raises questions concerning the relation between phenomena that are considered to be purely ‘syntactic’ and those that are discourse related. It has been noticed in the descriptive grammars of languages from various genetic groups  (e.g., Schadeberg 1990 for Umbundu) that there is a privileged relation between vocatives and injunctive particles, but this relation has rarely been explored in terms of the formal syntactic literature. Left-peripheral direct address particles have also received a lot of attention in the context of discourse studies but again, with some notable exceptions such as Munaro & Poletto (2004), del Gobbo & Poletto (2008), Hill (2008), Haegeman (to appear), Haegeman and Hill (2010, 2012), have often been left aside by syntacticians. In line with the papers cited, we adopt the hypothesis that a syntactic account of utterance-peripheral direct address particles is viable, and we will show how it may be deployed to capture aspects of the syntax of vocatives. Of particular interest to us is the fact that, in the cartographic approach, Force is the head with clause typing features, which is also seen as the edge of the narrow syntax configuration (equating the phase head C in Chomsky 2001). Since both utterance-peripheral particles and vocatives (Moro 2003) appear above the ForceP level, the data we are examining suggest that the narrow syntax extends beyond the ForceP layer. This conclusion is in line with a long standing tradition going back to Ross (1970) and Banfield (1982), among others, and is continued with different implementations by, among others, Miyagawa (2012), Sigurdsson (2004), Giorgi (2010) and Giorgi & Pianesi (2004), Zu (2011).},
  author       = {Haegeman, Liliane and Hill, Virginia},
  booktitle    = {On peripheries},
  editor       = {Cardinaletti, Anna and Cinque, Guglielmo and Endo, Yoshio },
  isbn         = {9784894767225},
  keywords     = {vocative,West Flemish,speech act projection,cartography,discourse particles},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {209--236},
  publisher    = {Hituzi Syobo Publishing},
  title        = {Vocatives and speech act pojections: a case study in West Flemish},
  year         = {2014},
}