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Amyloidosis: an unusual cause of mesenteric, omental and lymph node calcifications

(2014) JBR-BTR. 97(5). p.283-286
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Abstract
We present a rare case of amyloidosis initially presenting with giant calcified inguinal adenopathy. Further imaging revealed diffuse calcifications within the mesentery and greater omentum. Amyloid deposition may mimic chronic granulomatous disorders and primary or secondary neoplastic conditions. Although definite diagnosis is made on histology, the radiologist should include amyloidosis in the differential diagnosis in the absence of a clinical history of neoplastic disorders or chronic infection, especially if extensive intralesional calcifications are seen. Ultrasound may be useful to target solid noncalcified areas in easily accessible extraabdominal locations.
Keywords
NOMENCLATURE COMMITTEE, Amyloidosis, INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY, RECOMMENDATIONS, CT

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Citation

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Chicago
Vanhoenacker, Filip, K Vanwambeke, and G Jacomen. 2014. “Amyloidosis: An Unusual Cause of Mesenteric, Omental and Lymph Node Calcifications.” Jbr-btr 97 (5): 283–286.
APA
Vanhoenacker, F., Vanwambeke, K., & Jacomen, G. (2014). Amyloidosis: an unusual cause of mesenteric, omental and lymph node calcifications. JBR-BTR, 97(5), 283–286.
Vancouver
1.
Vanhoenacker F, Vanwambeke K, Jacomen G. Amyloidosis: an unusual cause of mesenteric, omental and lymph node calcifications. JBR-BTR. 2014;97(5):283–6.
MLA
Vanhoenacker, Filip, K Vanwambeke, and G Jacomen. “Amyloidosis: An Unusual Cause of Mesenteric, Omental and Lymph Node Calcifications.” JBR-BTR 97.5 (2014): 283–286. Print.
@article{5750288,
  abstract     = {We present a rare case of amyloidosis initially presenting with giant calcified inguinal adenopathy. Further imaging revealed diffuse calcifications within the mesentery and greater omentum.
Amyloid deposition may mimic chronic granulomatous disorders and primary or secondary neoplastic conditions. Although definite diagnosis is made on histology, the radiologist should include amyloidosis in the differential diagnosis in the absence of a clinical history of neoplastic disorders or chronic infection, especially if extensive intralesional calcifications are seen. Ultrasound may be useful to target solid noncalcified areas in easily accessible extraabdominal locations.},
  author       = {Vanhoenacker, Filip and Vanwambeke, K and Jacomen, G},
  issn         = {1780-2393},
  journal      = {JBR-BTR},
  keywords     = {NOMENCLATURE COMMITTEE,Amyloidosis,INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY,RECOMMENDATIONS,CT},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {283--286},
  title        = {Amyloidosis: an unusual cause of mesenteric, omental and lymph node calcifications},
  volume       = {97},
  year         = {2014},
}

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