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First step toward near-infrared continuous glucose monitoring: in vivo evaluation of antibody coupled biomaterials

Karolien Gellynck UGent, Valérie Kodeck, Elke Van De Walle, Ken Kersemans, Filip De Vos UGent, Heidi Declercq UGent, Peter Dubruel UGent, Lieven Vlaminck UGent and Maria Cornelissen UGent (2015) EXPERIMENTAL BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE. 240(4). p.446-457
abstract
Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) is crucial in diabetic care. Long-term CGM systems however require an accurate sensor as well as a suitable measuring environment. Since large intravenous sensors are not feasible, measuring inside the interstitial fluid is considered the best alternative. This option, unfortunately, has the drawback of a lag time with blood glucose values. A good strategy to circumvent this is to enhance tissue integration and enrich the peri-implant vasculature. Implants of different optically transparent biomaterials (poly(methyl-methacrylate) [PMMA] and poly(dimethylsiloxane) [PDMS]) - enabling glucose monitoring in the near-infrared (NIR) spectrum - were surface-treated and subsequently implanted in goats at various implantation sites for up to 3 months. The overall in vivo biocompatibility, tissue integration, and vascularization at close proximity of the surfaces of these materials were assessed. Histological screening showed similar tissue reactions independent of the implantation site. No significant inflammation reaction was observed. Tissue integration and vascularization correlated, to some extent, with the biomaterial composition. A modification strategy, in which a vascular endothelial-cadherin antibody was coupled to the biomaterials surface through a dopamine layer, showed significantly enhanced vascularization 3 months after subcutaneous implantation. Our results suggest that the developed strategy enables the creation of tissue interactive NIR transparent packaging materials, opening the possibility of continuous glucose monitoring.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
In vivo, antibody-coupled, continuous glucose monitoring, vascular endothelial-cadherin, enhanced vascularization, VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL-CADHERIN, BLOOD-VESSEL FORMATION, NEOINTIMAL FORMATION, DIABETES-MELLITUS, GROWTH-FACTOR, TISSUE, SPECTROSCOPY, DIFFUSION, IMPLANTS, SILICON
journal title
EXPERIMENTAL BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE
Exp. Biol. Med.
volume
240
issue
4
pages
446 - 457
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000353054600005
JCR category
MEDICINE, RESEARCH & EXPERIMENTAL
JCR impact factor
2.542 (2015)
JCR rank
57/124 (2015)
JCR quartile
2 (2015)
ISSN
1535-3702
DOI
10.1177/1535370214554878
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
5738904
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-5738904
date created
2014-10-27 15:45:28
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:42:18
@article{5738904,
  abstract     = {Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) is crucial in diabetic care. Long-term CGM systems however require an accurate sensor as well as a suitable measuring environment. Since large intravenous sensors are not feasible, measuring inside the interstitial fluid is considered the best alternative. This option, unfortunately, has the drawback of a lag time with blood glucose values. A good strategy to circumvent this is to enhance tissue integration and enrich the peri-implant vasculature. Implants of different optically transparent biomaterials (poly(methyl-methacrylate) [PMMA] and poly(dimethylsiloxane) [PDMS]) - enabling glucose monitoring in the near-infrared (NIR) spectrum - were surface-treated and subsequently implanted in goats at various implantation sites for up to 3 months. The overall in vivo biocompatibility, tissue integration, and vascularization at close proximity of the surfaces of these materials were assessed. Histological screening showed similar tissue reactions independent of the implantation site. No significant inflammation reaction was observed. Tissue integration and vascularization correlated, to some extent, with the biomaterial composition. A modification strategy, in which a vascular endothelial-cadherin antibody was coupled to the biomaterials surface through a dopamine layer, showed significantly enhanced vascularization 3 months after subcutaneous implantation. Our results suggest that the developed strategy enables the creation of tissue interactive NIR transparent packaging materials, opening the possibility of continuous glucose monitoring.},
  author       = {Gellynck, Karolien and Kodeck, Val{\'e}rie and Van De Walle, Elke and Kersemans, Ken and De Vos, Filip and Declercq, Heidi and Dubruel, Peter and Vlaminck, Lieven and Cornelissen, Maria},
  issn         = {1535-3702},
  journal      = {EXPERIMENTAL BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE},
  keyword      = {In vivo,antibody-coupled,continuous glucose monitoring,vascular endothelial-cadherin,enhanced vascularization,VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL-CADHERIN,BLOOD-VESSEL FORMATION,NEOINTIMAL FORMATION,DIABETES-MELLITUS,GROWTH-FACTOR,TISSUE,SPECTROSCOPY,DIFFUSION,IMPLANTS,SILICON},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {446--457},
  title        = {First step toward near-infrared continuous glucose monitoring: in vivo evaluation of antibody coupled biomaterials},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1535370214554878},
  volume       = {240},
  year         = {2015},
}

Chicago
Gellynck, Karolien, Valérie Kodeck, Elke Van De Walle, KEN KERSEMANS, Filip De Vos, Heidi Declercq, Peter Dubruel, Lieven Vlaminck, and Maria Cornelissen. 2015. “First Step Toward Near-infrared Continuous Glucose Monitoring: In Vivo Evaluation of Antibody Coupled Biomaterials.” Experimental Biology and Medicine 240 (4): 446–457.
APA
Gellynck, Karolien, Kodeck, V., Van De Walle, E., KERSEMANS, K., De Vos, F., Declercq, H., Dubruel, P., et al. (2015). First step toward near-infrared continuous glucose monitoring: in vivo evaluation of antibody coupled biomaterials. EXPERIMENTAL BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, 240(4), 446–457.
Vancouver
1.
Gellynck K, Kodeck V, Van De Walle E, KERSEMANS K, De Vos F, Declercq H, et al. First step toward near-infrared continuous glucose monitoring: in vivo evaluation of antibody coupled biomaterials. EXPERIMENTAL BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE. 2015;240(4):446–57.
MLA
Gellynck, Karolien, Valérie Kodeck, Elke Van De Walle, et al. “First Step Toward Near-infrared Continuous Glucose Monitoring: In Vivo Evaluation of Antibody Coupled Biomaterials.” EXPERIMENTAL BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE 240.4 (2015): 446–457. Print.